MOOC


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MOOC

(Massive Open Online Course) Free online educational courses available to the public at large. The MOOC handles the online delivery of the courseware that has been created by participating schools and organizations. Although various MOOCs were launched in the late 2000s, MOOC activity began to escalate in 2011 when Stanford University offered three courses and several more in 2012.

Also in 2012, MIT and Harvard launched their MOOC under the edX banner; Coursera started offering courses from several universities, and Udacity began to deliver courses sponsored by universities and high-tech vendors.

In just a few years, hundreds of thousands of people have taken advantage of the education, and certification is available, in some cases for a fee to the sponsoring university. See CBT, courseware and e-learning.
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This market is in the growth stage in Asia-Pacific (APAC), Europe, Middle East and Africa (MEA), and Latin America, therefore MOOC technologies in these regions will have immense scope for enhancement.
The next question is, Could the original form of the MOOC transform teaching and learning in high schools?
The two parts of the MOOC course are divided into five lessons each, and they're taught by institute instructors Deborah Healey, Jeff Magoto and Elizabeth Hanson-Smith.
If, as Gutmann posits, institutions of higher education sustain democracy "as sanctuaries of nonrepression," MOOC platforms carry nonrepression to an extreme (perhaps with the caveat that not all ideas expressed within online education forums are intellectually 'valuable') (Gutmann, 1999, p.
Palmer says there's a lot of controversy surrounding MOOCs because there is no college credit or certification given.
However, the Sunderland students also benefited from face to face discussions with businesses and lecturers - and that's far more difficult to achieve with a MOOC.
Brown University recently began offering Exploring Engineering, which is a pre-college engineering course provided through Canvas Network, the MOOC platform on the Canvas Learning Management System.
Gecan's objection is that: "the MOOC movement is built on a set of very shaky assumptions.
The research shows that individuals decide to participate in a MOOC for very diverse reasons: 1) to enrich their lives, 2) because the subject is relevant to their work, 3) because they are college students looking for more ways to study a subject they are learning in a traditional classroom, 4) because they are faculty who want to watch how other faculty teach their subject, 5) or because they are stay-at-home parents or retirees with free time to fill, to name only a few.
Suppose you take your course work through a MOOC and then select a university for completing your education and having immersive experiences with researchers in your selected research area.
Because MOOCs commonly reach 100,000 or more participants, Stark and others have dubbed the course, Programming for Infant and Young Child Feeding, "a mini-MOOC.
For statistics and information on MOOC completion see this Chronicle of Higher Education publication: http://chronicle.