Luddite

(redirected from Machine-breaking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.

Luddite

English history
any of the textile workers opposed to mechanization who rioted and organized machine-breaking between 1811 and 1816

Luddite

An individual who is against technological change. Luddite comes from Englishman Ned Lud, who rose up against his employer in the late 1700s. Subsequently, "Luddites" emerged in other companies to protest and even destroy new machinery that would put them out of a job. A neo-Luddite is a Luddite in the Internet age.

Luddite vs. Technophobe
A Luddite is anti-technology because of personal principles, whereas a technophobe is afraid of computers and high-tech gadgets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Machine-breaking outbreaks in Lancashire and the Midlands flared up from 1778 to 1780.
Although machine-breaking had been a considerable, customary form of industrial relations in Britain for a century, it assumed a darker and more tragic place in the folklore of industrialization with the Luddites.
Nor did machine-breaking disappear with the Luddites.
If the longevity, geographical scope, and popular support for machine-breaking activities in Great Britain was impressive, the one-sided magnitude of government repression of such movements must astonish even those who recognize the interventionist reality of early liberal administration.
Rude's argument is that machine-breaking was only the most spectacular aspect of the popular restiveness of the early industrial period.
29) Machine-breaking and its repression highlights once again the disparity between laissez-faire ideas and government action in early Industrial Britain while emphasizing the need for a reconsideration of the role of the state in the link between industrial protest and technological change, particularly after the end of continental war in 1815.
The argument that machine-breaking, among a host of popular actions, evoked a disproportional state response frames any evaluation of the effects of machine-breaking in England.
The historiographical consensus essentially contends that machine-breaking had some limited, albeit temporary, successes in Great Britain.