Mad Mod


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Teen Titans vol. 1 #7 © 1967 DC Comics. COVER ART BY NICK CARDY.

Mad Mod

(pop culture)
The Mad Mod, the Teen Titans' (TTs) most rakish rogue, was cut from the psychedelic cloth of mid-1960s Carnaby Street fashions. The TTs discover in Teen Titans vol. 1 #7 (1967) that the smuggling ring they've tailed to London is fronted by Neil Richards, aka the Mad Mod, clothing designer for touring Brit rocker Holley Hip, a patsy whose “loverly” threads secretly conceal contraband. Once the Titans are hip to the Mod's scene, the fiendish fashion plate nearly bags them with a series of deathtraps until the TTs take the Mod to the cleaners. The brainchild of madcap scribe Bob Haney and illustrator Nick Cardy, the mop-topped Mad Mod was prescient of Austin Powers and Zoolander, decades before those parodies were born. Fads die as quickly as they rise, and after a 1968 return gig at which he stole the Queen's scepter, the Mad Mod, along with mod fashions themselves, peacocked down the runway to limbo, although in a token 1997 appearance the Mod announced that he had reformed. That same year, however, comedian Mike Myers made mod cool again with the soon-to-be-franchised spy spoof Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery. On the Italian-leather heels of Powers' third movie in 2002, a Carnaby-conscious public met the Mad Mod—“'Ello, Guv'ner!”—on television's anime-like Teen Titans (2003–2006). TV's mind-bending Mad Mod is a brazen bloke who detained the Titans in a brainwashing school (“Mad Mod,” original airdate: September 27, 2003), then tried to reclaim New York City as the property of England (“Revolution,” October 16, 2004). Rampant pop-culture references dominated both episodes, from A Hard Day's Night/Scooby- Doo–inspired musically accompanied chase scenes to pastiches of the movie A Clockwork Orange (1971), the latter of which starred Malcolm McDowell, the actor who also provided the Mad Mod's cartoon voice.
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By the 1970s, tartan Mad Mod Vests and Hip Fringed Vests took the company into strange new territory, with a look that conjures images of lumberjacks listening to The Who.
But for all his productivity, Daniels will be forever associated with Jimmy the mad Mod, a youth cult icon who doesn't so much revive the hard image when you speak to him as reinforce him.
the hectic masses of the concrete jungle miss out on nature's green `muss'--"get green (knees and elbows), masses, drop out of the mad mod mess