Madurese


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Madurese

 

a people in Indonesia, inhabiting the island of Madura and the eastern areas of Java. There are about 8 million Madurese (1970; estimate). The language, similar to Sudanese and Javanese, belongs to the Indonesian languages; the religion is Islam. Occupations include livestock raising (mostly cattle, horses, and goats), agriculture (rice, corn, legumes, peanuts, pumpkins, tobacco), and, on the coast, fishing; crafts include pottery and the dressing of skins. Salt mining and trading are also important. The Madurese are skillful seafarers.

REFERENCE

Narody lugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
Palangkaraya is 220 kilometers east of Sampit -- where clashes last week led to the decapitation of some migrants -- and is home to about 12,000 Madurese, generally more dominant economically than the Dayaks.
Over several decades, he has returned again and again to Madura, and has even sailed with the Madurese in a number of directions.
They have also become very angry, so much so that some have undergone a grisly cultural reversion, beheading Madurese in an effort to regain their traditional land.
In addition to many Chinese (some Christian, but mostly Confucianist) there are kampongs of Moslem Buginese, Javanese, and Madurese settlers.
There was much violence and police with tracker dogs were used to assail the barricades erected by resisting Madurese (myth had it that Madurese are afraid of dogs).
The state-run news agency Antara reported at least seven people have been killed and at least 500 houses and shops belonging to migrant Madurese have been burnt and damaged in the capital since Sunday.
25) In an article Salmon (2010:505-22) makes reference to a short story written by Njoo on the plight of traditional Madurese fishermen in competition against modern Japanese fishing vessels, 'Achmad dan Kasijah', Sin Bin, 17 October 1925.
The Indonesian province of West Kalimantan entered the international spotlight in 1996-97 and again in 1999 as a result of massive ethnic violence that involved Dayaks, Malays and Madurese.
Ironically, the author tells us, it was through violence, by ousting the much-disliked Madurese, that the Dayaks in Kalimantan demonstrated their ability to unify in order to defend their interests and, in consequence, to gain substantial recognition of their adat claims.
Unlike the Madurese in West and Central Kalimantan who were forcibly removed from their home and land5 (Hunter 2002), people from Elah returned to their village of origin because of the fear of threats of violence.
The clash between Dayak natives of Borneo and migrant Madurese erupted at dawn Sunday.
The topicality of this text is in no small part due to the dramatic events in Kalimantan from late 1996 to 2001 when serious and bloody conflicts ensued between the primarily Christian Dayaks and the Muslim Madurese in the provinces of West and Central Kalimantan, resulting in a large loss of life and a significant refugee problem.