Mae Klong


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Mae Klong

 

a river in western Thailand. Length, 480 km; basin area, about 30,000 sq km. The river originates on the western slopes of the Tanen Taunggyi. The upper and middle course of the Mae Klong flows through mountain rapids; its lower course passes through the Menam Lowland. The river flows into the Gulf of Thailand in the South China Sea, forming a marshy delta. The river floods during the summer rains. The Mae Klong is connected by channels and navigable canals with the Menam Chao Phraya. The Mae Klong is navigable in its lower course. The river’s waters are used for irrigation. The cities of Kanchanaburi and Rat Buri are located on the Mae Klong.

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Located in Tambon Khlong Khon, the plantation offers an interesting ecotourism activity at the mouth of the Mae Klong bay, not far from Bangkok.
Resembling spotted silver blades slicing through river murk, Clown Knifefish originate from Indonesia, plus the great brown-water river systems of Southeast Asia - the Mekong, Chao Phraya and Mae Klong -snaking through Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand.
The present investigation used light-trapping for studying caddisflies of the Mae Klong watershed, western Thailand.
The book explains the difference between Oflag (a prison camp for officers) and Stalag (for enlisted men); that the only film Frank Sinatra ever directed was None but the Brave; and that the famous bridge actually went over the Mae Klong River, not its tributary the Khwae Noi ("Kwai").
This is Mae Klong, the Bangkok market that straddles railway lines.
The pictures, taken in January 1945 by the RAF, show the two bridges built by the Japanese - using labour from Tamarkan camp - which spanned the Mae Klong river (later renamed Kwa Yai).
The link between the security of water supply and the type of rent has been made clear by Barend Terwiel with regard to a village located 5 km south of Ratchaburi that shifted from the baeng ha system to fixed cash rents between 1967 and 1977, and by the contrast demonstrated in the late 1970s by Praipol Koomsup and Boonchuai Sreecomporn between the rainfed area of Phetchaburi province (95 per cent sharecropping) and the adjacent Mae Klong irrigated area (only 10 per cent).
Then it's on to Kanchanaburi, where the Khwae Noi and Khwae Yai rivers converge into the Mae Klong river and where, in 1942, under Japanese control, the famous Bridge on the River Kwai was built by prisoners of war (POWs).
This pristine sandbar, accessible by boat, is located in the mouth of Mae Klong River.
The aim of this study was to describe the functional structure of aquatic insect community on upstream of the Mae Klong watershed in the cold-dry season.