Magna Graecia


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Magna Graecia

(măg`nə grē`shə) [Lat.,=great Greece], Greek colonies of S Italy. The Greek overseas expansion of the 8th cent. B.C. founded a number of towns that became the centers of a new, thriving Greek territory. They were on both coasts from the Bay of Naples and the Gulf of Taranto southward. Unlike Greek Sicily, Magna Graecia began to decline by 500 B.C., probably because of malaria and endless warfare among the colonies. Only Tarentum (now Taranto) and Cumae remained individually very significant. Magna Graecia was the center of two philosophical groups in the 6th cent. B.C., that of Parmenides at Elea and that of Pythagoras at Crotona. Through Cumae especially, the Etruscans of Capua and the Romans came into early contact with Greek civilization. The following are the chief cities of Magna Graecia (those colonized from Greece, except Thurii and Elea, go back to the 8th or early 7th cent. B.C.; those colonized locally are perhaps a century younger)—on the east coast from north to south, Tarentum (colonized from Sparta), Metapontum (from Achaea), Heraclea (from Tarentum), Siris (from Colophon), Sybaris (from Achaea), Thurii (from Athens, replacing Sybaris), Crotona (from Achaea), Caulonia (from Crotona), Epizephyrian Locris (from Locris); on the west coast from north to south, Cumae (from Chalcis), Neapolis (now Naples; from Cumae), Paestum, or Posidonia (from Sybaris), Elea (from Phocaea in Ionia), Laos (from Sybaris), Hipponium (from Epizephyrian Locris), and Rhegium (now Reggio de Calabria; from Chalcis).

Bibliography

See D. Randall-MacIver, Greek Cities of Italy and Sicily (1931); T. J. Dunbabin, The Western Greeks (1948); A. G. Woodhead, The Greeks in the West (1962).

Magna Graecia

(in the ancient world) S Italy, where numerous colonies were founded by Greek cities
References in periodicals archive ?
Antonio Cicione, Urology Unit, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Viale Europa, Germaneto, Catanzaro 88100, Italy; fax: 039-09613647184; acicione@libero.
Yet, Magna Graecia was subsumed by Roman hegemony, and, in historical terms, the Greek presence was muddled by a reliance on the succession-of-empires argument -- that succeeding civilizations absorb the strengths and intelligence of the societies they conquer.
Cannataro is affiliated with University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Italy.
Increased contacts between Etruria and Magna Graecia to the south during the fourth century brought northward influences from the workshops of Taras.
The theme is Caravaggio, Baroque art and Magna Graecia (the ancient Greeks in Italy).
Our research group, a cooperative effort of the University of Magna Graecia in Italy and the University of Texas in Houston, in collaboration with other Italian universities, is currently focused on the development of silicon-based nanoporous particles.
Then the rats were either exposed to 95 dB of background electronic music or were not subjected to acoustic stimulation, according to an online report of the work done by Michelangelo Iannone of the Institute of Neurological Science, Italy, and collaborators from the University Magna Graecia in Catanzaro, Italy.
Then the rats were either exposed to 95dB of background electronic music or were not subjected to acoustic stimulation, according to an online report of the work done by Michelangelo Iannone of the Institute of Neurological Science, Italy, and collaborators from the University Magna Graecia in Catanzaro, Italy.
The literary tradition is the cumulus of a particular type of intellectual activity that first became possible less than three thousand years ago in Syria and the Levant and, a bit later, in the Greek cities from Ionia to Magna Graecia.
As Peddie's own narrative shows, the towns of Magna Graecia were something more than `trading posts' (35).
After a successful performing tour of Sicily and Magna Graecia, Arion sailed for home.