magnetic pickup


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magnetic pickup

[mag′ned·ik ′pi‚kəp]
(engineering acoustics)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, closer inspection reveals its lack of traditional magnetic pickups under the strings.
The MP-120 (5) magnetic pickup generates power/signal representing rpm to terminals 1 and 2 of the EGC-500; here the advanced circuit design, which utilities PID control, modifies the signal to a DC output current of 2-10 mA out of the terminals 10 and 12 (2-10 mA is used instead of the conventional 4-20 mA to minimize the necessary cranking speed to power up).
However, one lingering problem remained: the magnetic pickups used in traditional electric guitars have inherent noise, interfere with string vibration, and generate their own tone, never allowing the instrument to reach the perfection of its sound.
Magnetic pickups are the box-like devices found under the strings on the body of an electric guitar.
A universal speed input permits use with magnetic pickups, coil-type or magneto spark ignition systems, and Hall-effect sensors.
Though old time rockers may raise eyebrows at the bodies bereft of magnetic pickups - digital pickups in the bridge measure all vibrations - the guitars are designed to be accessible to both the novice picker and techno geek alike.
Typical applications include monitoring magnetic pickups, proximity sensors, TTL devices, and a variety of switches.
Magnetic pickups can alter the instrument's frequency response or dampen the sustain.
In 1931, magnetic pickups were developed to transform strings' vibrations into electrical impulses that accurately reproduced the sound.