Magnoliidae


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Magnoliidae

A subclass of the class Magnoliopsida (dicotyledons) in the division Magnoliophyta (Angiospermae), the flowering plants. The subclass consists of 8 orders, 39 families, and more than 12,000 species. The Magnoliidae are the most primitive subclass of flowering plants. In general, they have a well-developed perianth, which may or may not be numerous, centripetal stamens, and they are apocarpous. See Aristolochiales, Illiciales, Laurales, Magnoliales, Magnoliophyta, Magnoliopsida, Nymphaeales, Papaverales, Piperales, Plant kingdom, Ranunculales

Magnoliidae

[‚mag·nō′lī·ə‚dē]
(botany)
A primitive subclass of flowering plants in the class Magnoliopsida generally having a well-developed perianth, numerous centripetal stamens, and bitegmic, crassinucellate ovules.
References in periodicals archive ?
En la subclase Magnoliidae, que incluye los miembros mas primitivos, como la familia Annonaceae.
Mikromorphologie der Epicuticularwachse und die Systematik der Magnoliidae, Ranunculidae und Hamamelididae.
Sobre especies de las subclases; Magnoliidae, Hamameliidae, Caryophyllidae, Dilleniidae, Rosidae y Asteridae, de la clase Magnoliopsida y sobre la subclase Zingiberiidae, de la clase Liliopsida.
Distribucion: principalmente tropical en America, Africa y Asia; sobre especies de las subclases Magnoliidae, Hamamelidae, Dilleniidae.
Undoubtedly, the capitula found in the various taxa of the Magnoliidae (Table V) arose from different progenitors.
The widespread distribution of primary capitula in the Magnoliidae (Table V) lends indirect evidence for this.
The most rigorous test of the hypothesized major trends in angiosperm wood evolution will be realized through comprehensive cladistic analyses that include wood anatomical characters among the suite of characters used in the analysis (Herendeen, work in progress), but preliminary insights can emerge from an examination of the distribution of several wood anatomical characters in families of Magnoliidae and "lower" Hamamelididae against current cladistic hypotheses of their interrelationships.
WOOD STRUCTURE IN MAGNOLIIDAE AND "LOWER" HAMAMELIDIDAE
Phylogenetic relationships among families of Magnoliidae and "lower" Hamamelididae have been investigated by Lammers et al.
Many of the data came from descriptions given by Metcalfe and Chalk (1950) and Metcalfe (1987), and from a series of papers on wood of the Magnoliidae (Canright, 1955; Wilson, 1960; Shutts, 1960; Carlquist, 1981, 1982a, 1982b, 1983a, 1983b, 1983c, 1984, 1988a, 1989a, 1989b, 1990a, 1990b, 1992a, 1992b, 1993; Takahashi, 1985; Chen et al.