Mehmed II

(redirected from Mahomet II)
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Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
over Persian Xerxes (whose father, Darius, had begun the conflict a decade before), Aeschylus' drama naturally lent itself to the current Greek struggle against Turkish Mahmud (whose ancestor Mahomet II had subjected Greece to the foreign domination she had been suffering for three and a half centuries).
Only at the final moment of that vision does he recognize with a shock the presence of Mahomet II and realize that the Islamites are attacking the city, not defending it.
Its plot does derive from Knolles, but Goffe stitches together the histories of two different rulers and attributes the actions of both to his protagonist Amurath: acts 1-2 come from Knolles's account of Mahomet II (Mehmed II, 1432-1481), and acts 3-5 dramatize episodes from the life and death of Amurath I (Murad I, 1319-1389).
By combining the love of Mahomet II with the military conquests of Amurath I (and the murderous dynastic succession following his death), a fusion not found in other sources or analogues, Goffe constructs a protagonist whose potential for social action is defined by the opposing demands of love and war, and both love and war become debased as Amurath navigates his way through their conflicting imperatives.
Asombra comprobar cuantas dificultades encontro Mahomet II, con su casi un centenar de miles de hombres y su formidable maquinaria de guerra, para conseguir finalmente tomar la ciudad.
Con gran capacidad descriptiva traza el cuadro grandioso, sin duda, de la ciudad y de los acontecimientos que en ella y respecto de ella se desarrollaron desde el 29 de mayo de 1453, cuando Mahomet II el Conquistador entro triunfalmente a Santa Sofia, hasta la medianoche del 4 de marzo de 1924, cuando el ultimo Sultan y Califa partio al exilio en el Expreso de Oriente desde la estacion de Tsataltza.
Mahomet II, el Conquistador, dispuso la norma y la aplico, haciendo morir a sus dos hermanos.