Maillard reaction


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Maillard reaction

[mī′yär rē‚ak·shən]
(biochemistry)
A reaction in which the amino group in an amino acid tends to form condensation products with aldehydes; believed to cause the Browning reaction when an amino acid and a sugar coexist, evolving a characteristic flavor useful in food preparations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glycation is produced by the Maillard reaction, a chemical reaction--particularly well known in cooking--between an amino acid and a sugar molecule that typically requires heat.
Moreover, has two different effects of sugar on muscle protein are to produce a brown color through the Maillard reaction and caramelization and to generate heat denaturation by stabilizing proteins [6].
The main chemical reaction is known as the Maillard reaction
Much research has focused on the formation of Maillard reaction products, including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and acrylamide.
Besides that, the phenomena of Maillard reaction or known as non-enzymatic browning that resulted from sugars and amino acids interaction tend to decrease the pH values.
During the Maillard reaction, harmful substances called Maillard reaction products emerge.
Other than in diabetes mellitus ("sugar diabetes"), there was really little medical scientific interest in the Maillard reaction in medical science or practice.
When cooked at high temperatures, sugars react with amino acids, including asparagine, in a chemical process known as the Maillard reaction.
It is considered one of the best mediums for cooking because it maintains and distributes heat evenly, effectively develops the Maillard reaction to ensure searing and browning of food, self-seasons, and defines versatility for everything from sauteing to deep-frying.
But, thanks to the application of chemistry basics like the Maillard reaction, this elixir is undergoing new permutations in everything from alcohol to butter and desserts.
Oberparleiter and Ziegleder [9] have confirmed earlier findings by Hashim and Chaveron [7] and Cros and Jeanjean [8] by identifying Amadori compounds, the first intermediates of Maillard reaction in dried, unroasted cocoa beans.
The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is the initial step in the Maillard reaction and proceeds when a sugar carbonyl group condenses.