Maillol


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Maillol

Aristide . 1861--1944, French sculptor, esp of monumental female nudes
References in periodicals archive ?
As this fall-s splendid exhibition at Marlborough Gallery made dear, the sculpture of Aristide Maillol (1861-1944) Can be described more or less the same way?
After being arrested but acquitted, Maillol sent her out of harm's way to pose for Matisse in Nice with the note: 'Matisse, I am sending you the object of my work; so you can reduce her to a line.
Compared to Degas's work, which seems to leap off the pedestal, even the sculpture of Rodin and Maillol seems inert.
Polemics aside, the present exhibition at Paris's Musee Maillol, following a stint at the Palazzo Reale in Milan, is a revelation, for it proves that Gentileschi was a great painter whose reputation can stand alone, without special pleading.
Sculpting as a painter," for a man of Matisse's generation, could have meant only two things: First, that the sculpture would be frontal, admitting--or, at the very least, privileging--only one point of view, as in the case of the works shown by Alexander Archipenko, Emile-Antoine Bourdelle, Charles Despiau, Alberto Giacometti, Jacques Lipchitz, Aristide Maillol, and even, surprisingly for me, Auguste Rodin; second, it meant that the sculptor would avoid clear and linear contours in favor of highly agitated surfaces in an attempt to imitate pictorial effects.
Designed by landscape architect Darwin Fuerstein, the 30-acre park includes sculptures by Rodin, Henry Moore, Aristide Maillol, Louise Nevelson, Keith Haring and Antony Gormley.
These young artists, who banded together in Paris in 1888 as the Nabis (from the Hebrew word for "prophet"), were a disparate, precocious lot, ranging from the Dutch- and Swiss-born painters Jan Verkade and Felix Vallotton, both aged twenty at the time of the group's formation, to the French sculptor Aristide Maillol, who at twenty-seven was the Nabis's senior member.
He gained the respect of a new generation of artists--for example, he commissioned a bronze from Aristide Maillol, who had only recently switched to sculpture, in 1902, and in 1914 his artistic advice was sought by Kees van Dongen in Amsterdam.
In addition to sculpture by Auguste Rodin, the works of important sculptors including Aristide Maillol, Jacques Lipchitz, Henry Moore, Louise Nevelson, Keith Haring, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Mark di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, and George Rickey will be featured.
Maillol provides a rare moment of comedy when, in 1930, he accompanies Kessler from Paris to Weimar, taking along his young and high-spirited model.
On the other hand Rodin, who is also discussed in the Maillol essay, did not really, it seems, sleep with his male models: "It was a collaboration, not a seduction," Fenton carefully concludes.