bran

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bran,

outer coat of a cereal grain—e.g., wheat, rye, and corn—mechanically removed from commercial flour and meal by bolting or sifting. Wheat bran is extensively used as feed for farm animals. Bran is used as food for humans (in cereals or mixed with flour in bread) to add roughage (i.e., cellulose) to the diet. It is also used in dyeing and calico printing.

Bran

 

a miling by-product consisting of the seed coat of various grains and the remains of unsorted flour. There are wheat, rye, barley, rice, buckwheat, and other types of bran. Depending on the degree of pulverization, bran may be coarse or fine. Bran, primarily wheat and rye bran, is a valuable feed for all types of agricultural animals. The nutritional value of bran depends on the content of flour particles (the less flour and the more shell, the lower the nutritional value). The average composition of wheat bran is 14.8 percent water, 15.5 percent protein, 3.2 percent fat, 8.4 percent cellulose, 53.2 percent nitrogen-free extractive substances, and 4.9 percent ash. One hundred kg of bran contains 71–78 feed units and 12.5–13 kg of digestible protein. A high bran content in bread reduces digestibility, whereas a small amount of bran improves the taste of the bread and increases peristalsis. Flax bran is used for poultices, and mustard bran for mustard plasters. Almond bran is used as a softening agent for the face and hands.

Bran

god whose cauldron restored dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]
See: Death

Bran

god whose cauldron restored the dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]

bran

husks of cereal grain separated from the flour by sifting
References in periodicals archive ?
Four groups of rats, each of eight, were fed on wheat bran feed (WBF), maize bran feed (MBF), barley ss glucan extract feed (BGF), and sorghum ss glucan extract feed (SGF) for 28 days.
Wheat bran and Maize bran diets prepared after the modification of Purified Diet AIN-93G
In this work, similar nanocomposites were prepared and used for Cr(VI) adsorption by the polymerization of aniline on the surface of rice bran, maize bran and wheat bran.
All of the maize sorted as bad or mouldy portion collected from farmers' households and maize bran samples from small-scale mills as animal feed had contamination levels below the MTL for animal feeds of 20 pg/kg for aflatoxin and 5-100 mg/kg for fumonisin [21, 19] as indicated in Table 1.
Although, maize bran was a common ingredient found in all the three countries, its CP level was slightly higher but not significantly (P>0.