Maja Desnuda

Maja Desnuda

Goya’s celebrated picture of woman in the nude. [Span. Art: Spain, 246–247]
See: Nudity
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One of the exhibition's many pleasures is the juxtaposition of Goya's Maja desnuda from the Prado, never before seen outside Spain, with Ingres's Odalisque en grisaille from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), no less exquisite than the familiar colour version, or Manet's Olympia with a number of Picasso's reclining nudes from his later years.
Significant also is his inclusion of actual framed reproductions of the paintings to which Manet's Olympia alludes: Titian's Venus of Urbino (1538), Goya's Maja Desnuda (1800), and Cabanel's The Birth of Venus (1863).
In Condo's Maja Desnuda Goya's chaise longue entirely disappears, but its green colour emerges in the surprising green fingers of the reclining figure's right hand which creep across her hip.