Bowes, Edward

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Bowes, Edward

(1874–1946) entrepreneur, radio impresario; born in San Francisco. He left school at age 13 and worked as an office boy. He built a flourishing real estate business that was temporarily ruined by the earthquake and fire of 1906. He married Margaret Illington, an actress, and they moved east to run theaters in Boston and New York City. He built the Capitol Theater in New York City, an early movie "palace," and in 1925 became the host of a popular radio program that had originated from there since 1922. In 1934, as manager of New York City's radio station WHN, he began "Major Bowes' Original Amateur Hour," which offered potential stardom and a $10 stipend to contestants during the Great Depression. While he hosted this popular network radio program until 1945, his manner and expressions became known nationwide. He left most of his $4.5 million estate to charity.
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He launched The Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour on New York radio in 1934.
His name was Edward Bowes but he became a legend after promoting himself to Major Bowes, and that is how he'll always be remembered.
He took Major Bowes Amateur Hour to radio in 1934 and lo, in the fullness of time an act called the Hoboken Four turned up.
They became the Hoboken Four, won the talent show outright and embarked on a tour run by Major Bowes.
n His performing career began in 1935 when he auditioned for a popular radio show Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour.
1935: Wins Major Bowes Amateur Hour singing contest as part of the Hoboken Four.
He and his singing group, the Hoboken Four, crossed the great divide after winning first prize on Major Bowes radio ``Amateur Hour.
You can hear Callas in a 1935 broadcast of radio's Major Bowes Amateur Hour (she lost), listen to the legendary E-flat from a 1951 Mexico City Aida triumphal scene, sample her collaborations with conductors Herbert von Karajan and Leonard Bernstein, and weep at a 1958 London production of La Traviata, during which the soprano achieves what sounds very much like an out-of-body experience.
Young generation readers will probably fail to make much of the 1934 Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour or the later Vox Pop and We the People programs, but DeLong has dug up enough interesting detail to bring back an era long gone.
September 8 - The Hoboken Four, with Frank Sinatra as lead singer, wins first prize on radio's Major Bowes Amateur Hour, beginning Sinatra's musical career.
with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and with Major Bowes Revue.
I must go now," he says, "as `The Major Bowes Amateur Hour' is on live from New York City, and I just got the 'ol Atwater Kent back from the shop.
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