Makonde


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Makonde

 

a people living mainly in southern Tanzania, between the Lukuledi and Ruvuma rivers, and partly in northeastern Mozambique. Numbering more than 700,000 (1970, estimate), the Makonde speak a language belonging to the eastern group of the Bantu language family. The majority are Muslims. Swahili and Arabic influence is discernible in their culture. The chief occupation is farming, although many Makonde are seasonal workers on sisal plantations and in the cities.

References in periodicals archive ?
The recruits also included officers from the Makonde community, who were accorded citizenship rights last year after living in Kenya since before Independence.
The virus was isolated in the year 1952-53 from a patient with febrile illness while an outbreak on the Makonde plateau in the Southern province of Tanzania was going on.
Wooden mask of the Makonde Tribe, Museum Fur Volkerkunde, Hamburg.
He introduces this book as a microhistory of the mapiko masquerade of the northern Mozambican Makonde from 1920 to 2010 and contends that the study of mapiko reveals the 'forms of political subjectivity, affiliation and affect' that emerged on the Makonde Plateau throughout the twentieth century (p.
The virus was initially isolated in Tanzania in 1952 and named "chikungunya" after the Makonde word meaning "that which bends up," referring to symptoms experienced by affected individuals (5).
Among them are negotiations for the return of Nok sculptures from France to Nigeria, and of a Makonde Mask from Switzerland to Tanzania.
The disease derived its name from Makonde language, "that which bends up" because of the bent posture adopted by the affectee due to the rheumatological manifestations.
6) Just under 100 years later a moving service takes place in Akeri on the occasion of the 100 years' jubilee of the work of the Leipzig Mission in Tanzania with a gesture of reconciliation between Paul Akyoo, bishop of the Meru diocese, and Joachim Schlegel, director of the Leipzig Mission, during which a Makonde crucifix is handed over as symbol of reconciliation.
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was first isolated from human sera and mosquitoes in the Makonde Plateau of the Southern Province of Tanganyika (present day Tanzania) (Robinson 1955; Ross 1956).
The largest of Tanzania's many ethnic groups in descending order are: the Sukuma, Nyamwezi, Haya, Gogo, Makonde, Tumbuka-Ngoni, Ha, Chagga and Maasai.
Asi, aparecen 2 trabajos sobre Chope (Almeirim, 1957; Cardoso, 1957), 1 sobre la etnia makonde (Pombeiro, 1951), 8 sobre los macua (Almeida, 1951; Andrade, 1951, Baptista, 1951; Raphael, 1955; Oliveira, 1956; Ribeiro, 1956; Ferreira 1956; Conceicao, 1960), 1 de los manica (Ladeira, 1957), 1 de los ndau (Amorim, 1956), 4 de los ngoni (Lucas, 1951, 1957 (10); Lopes, 1956; Veloso, 1957), 5 sobre los sena (Madeira, 1951; Monteiro, 1951; Gens, 1956; Ferreira, 1960; Magalhaes, 1960), 1 de los swazi (Ascension, 1957), otro de los tawara (Domingo, 1956), 4 entre los thonga (Gandara, 1951; Barros, 1957; Fonseca, 1957; Sarria, 1957), 1 de los yao (Carvalho, 1956) y 1 de los zimba (Rita-Ferreira, 1952).
Chikungunya virus was first identified in the 1950s on the Makonde Plateau in Africa.