Malatesta


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Malatesta

(mälätĕ`stä), Italian family, ruling RiminiRimini
, anc. Ariminum, city (1991 pop. 127,960), in Emilia-Romagna, N central Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It is a highly diversified industrial, commercial, and railroad center and a fashionable beach resort. Tourism is extremely important.
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 and nearby cities for almost 300 years from the 13th to 16th cent. Malatesta da Verucchio (d. 1312), a powerful Guelph leader, became (1239) podestà, or chief magistrate, of Rimini and used this position to entrench his family's position in the area. His hunchback son Gianciotto was married to Francesca da RiminiFrancesca da Rimini
, fl. 13th cent., Italian beauty, daughter of Guido da Polenta of Ravenna. She was married by proxy to the hunchbacked lord of Rimini, Gianciotto Malatesta; the proxy, Gianciotto's young and handsome brother Paolo, became Francesca's lover.
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. With the expulsion of the family's Ghibelline rivals in 1295 the Malatesta rule in Rimini became well established, but papal investiture was made only in the following century. Branches of the family came to rule also Pesaro, Cesena, and Fano. In the 14th and 15th cent. several members of the family were noted condottiericondottiere
[Ital.,=leader], leader of mercenary soldiers in Italy in the 14th and 15th cent., when wars were almost incessant there. The condottieri hired and paid the bands who fought under them.
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 in the service of various Italian states. The most famous was Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417–68), a typical lord of the Italian Renaissance. A patron of arts and letters, he had the church of San Francesco in Rimini transformed into the Tempio Malatestiano [the temple of the Malatesta]. A despot excommunicated for numerous crimes, he engaged in a bitter conflict with the papacy over territorial claims, but he finally lost (1463) all his possessions except Rimini. His brother Novello, lord of Cesena, built there the fine Malatesta library. Sigismondo's son and grandson held the little state with difficulty, eventually losing it in 1500 to Cesare Borgia. Although the Malatesta family returned for brief intervals in the early 16th cent., Rimini passed definitively to the Holy See in 1528.

Malatesta

 

an Italian feudal family that from the late 13th to the early 16th centuries ruled in Rimini and extended its domination over part of Romagna and over Ancona of the Marches. The fierce struggle for power within the Malatesta family was accompanied by many perfidious assassinations; the tragic story of Francesca, the wife of one Malatesta in the early 14th century, has been immortalized by Dante in the Divine Comedy.

The most famous of the Malatestas, Sigismondo Pandolfo I (1417-68), surrounded himself with philosophers and scholars and collected a marvelous library. He also fought in many wars and served successively as condottiere of the pope, the rulers of Florence, and Alfonso of Aragon; in these wars he lost most of his possessions and entered the service of Venice. The Malatestas lost Rimini once and for all in 1528.

Malatesta

schemes outwit miser; enable young lovers to wed. [Ital. Opera: Donizetti, Don Pasquale, Westerman, 123–124]

Malatesta

an Italian family that ruled Rimini from the 13th to the 16th century
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Circle Program staff and participants, from left: front row - Judith Malatesta, clinician; social worker Dianne Crossley and Teresa Bonanno.
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Credited with coining the term, Italian anarchist-socialist Errico Malatesta declared in 1876 that his Italian federation "believes that the insurrectional fact, destined to affirm socialist principles by deed, is the most efficacious means of propaganda.
LONG A CLASSIC in French, this recent translation of anarchist writings includes excerpts from standard works by writers such as Max Stirner, Emma Goldman, Peter Kropotkin, Michael Bakunin, Buenaventura Durruti, and Errico Malatesta, and manifestoes, letters, and unpublished material to provide a rich collection of primary documents on the theory and history of anarchism in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Edited by Maria Malatesta (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
Malatesta only escaped this fate in 1912 following demonstrations (up to 15,000-strong) by British labour and the left, as well as immigrant communities; others were not so lucky.
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Little does he know that Malatesta is actually plotting on Ernesto's behalf, and the woman he thinks he has married, Sofronia, is actually Ernesto's love interest Norina, who is participating in the plan to teach Don Pasquale a lesson.
To teach Ernesto a lesson, the Don plans to marry and cut his nephew from his will but Dr Malatesta (Nicholas Lester) comes up with a cunning plan.