Malbecco

Malbecco

seeing his wife living among satyrs, he is so mad with jealosy that he casts himself from a cliff. [Br. Lit.: Spenser The Faerie Queene; Brewer Dictionary, 336]
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He soon becomes sleepy and sees a dream in his sleep, which is shown to the audience by the use of the discovery space: "He [St Dunston] layeth him down to sleep; Lightning and Thunder; the Curtains drawn, on a sudden Pluto, Minos, AEacus, Rhadamantus set in Counsell, before them Malbecco his Ghost guarded with Furies" (G2v).
69) Feeling sleepy, "He layeth him down to sleep; lightning and thunder; the curtains drawn, on a sudden Pluto, Minos, AEacus, Rhadamantus set in counsell, before them Malbecco his ghost guarded with Furies" (1.
By contrast, Malbecco mistakes both Hellenore and his wealth as ends in themselves rather than as paths to God, generation, or public commerce, sequestering both along with himself, and in this idolatrous misreading becomes himself an icon, both a sign of jealousy and the thing itself.