gaze

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Related to Male gaze: female gaze

gaze

the ‘look’, or viewpoint, inherent in particular cultural products. The concept originated in an article, ‘Visual pleasure and narrative cinema’ (Mulvey, 1975), which appeared in the critical film journal, Screen. Mulvey suggested that since most films are made by males, the ‘gaze’ of films is usually to objectify women – voyeuristically and stereotypically – from the point of view of the male spectator. Subsequently, the term has been used in related ways, for example, to refer more widely to the FEMALE GAZE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Represented as free from the trappings of fashion, Fanny's subjectivity acquires coherence and agency, while denying the male gaze voyeuristic pleasure.
In preparation to offer her up to Perry Smith and Dick Hickock, Capote's narrative male gaze transgresses all boundaries, moving into her bedroom, which he calls "the smallest, most personal room in the house" (55).
Finally, the commercial closes with a slogan like this: "To wake a male gaze is easy, but to wake the other [female gaze] is difficult, use X panty-hoes.
With her male gaze, she represents a special danger for the inversely effeminate and decadent dandy.
Whereas classical narrative cinema traditionally represent its Female characters as mere objects of the male gaze, Dulac takes Lola away from this passive role to make her an active critic of the world around her.
Long before twentieth-century scholars recognized and anatomized the psychosexual significance of the male gaze as it had developed in fiction and as it would be developed in twentieth-century film, Forster perceived that significance, and radically, if subtly, reconfigured the gaze to allow for a male Other.
Award-winning editor Susan Shipton (whose distinguished work includes The Adjuster, Exotica, The Sweet Hereafter, Felicia's Journey, Possible Worlds) makes a sure-footed, but disappointing, directorial debut in what is a rather slight comedic drama about the male gaze.
The veil is actually a symbol of women's authority because it enables them to speak without being turned into an object of the male gaze.
The dominant ideas about the male gaze emerging from the feminist movement are that any gaze that appropriates the other in its scope is by definition "masculine" -- whether by a man or by a woman, that gaze is based on a hierarchy of power relations in which the male is always dominant -- and that the gaze is by its very nature monolithic, since its function is appropriationist (see: Morris, 1994b).
By voluntarily removing themselves from the male gaze, these women assert their allegiance to a rich and varied tradition and at the same time preserve their sexual identity.
Her enthusiasm for an artistic movement dominated - and one might say, patrolled - by men, and for a body of work rife with images of objectified and violated women, has provoked some feminist scholars to accuse her of ignoring the achievements of women artists, celebrating misogyny and colluding with the culture's oppressive male gaze.
In many of the most memorable and moving scenes, the reader becomes aware of the oppressive male gaze invading female bodies in the public space, which in the novel is inherently a violent, male space.