Malebranche


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Malebranche

Nicolas . 1638--1715, French philosopher. Originally a follower of Descartes, he developed the philosophy of occasionalism, esp in De la recherche de la v?rit? (1674)
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See David Malebranche, Adverse Health Outcomes Among Black
was to argue, following Nicholas Malebranche, that true agency and causality in the universe rested only in God.
Malebranche prefers to substitute the word "androphile" for "gay" to describe himself, as he is an unrepentant advocate of the positive aspects of masculinity and male culture.
10) See Slavoj Zizek, "The Matrix or Malebranche in Hollywood," Philosophy Today 43: Supplement (1999): 11-26.
And--as Malebranche said--even if natural events are caused directly by God, and the world is thus an infinite series of miracles, the regularity in the natural order of things remains undisturbed.
And David Malebranche, a 34-year-old Atlanta physician, says, "It just gave me optimism about black men and black same-gender-loving people.
Such thinkers as Malebranche, Hutcheson, Smith, and Hume insisted that compassion is a natural and irrepressible human capacity, a passion in which even reason is rooted and a passion by which public life should be guided.
The final study in the book deals with the important twist Malebranche gave to Descartes's views, and contrasts both positions with those of a number of relevant others, particularly Foucher, Locke, Hume, and interestingly, Milton.
At times, the Enlightenment stalwarts Hume and Montesquieu might be granted some insight denied others; Carneades of the second century BC, Machiavelli in the sixteenth century, and Malebranche in the seventeenth were also conscripted for the wiser cause.
Chai uses the eighteenth-century method of reductio (the refutation of a proposition by showing its conclusion is absurd) to show that the thinking of four figures at the "end of the Enlightenment" - Locke, Malebranche, Leibniz, and Edwards - leads to unavoidable contradictions, but that this very failure teaches us important lessons about the nature of rationality.
Attention,' if you allow me a quote from Malebranche via Walter Benjamin's essay on Kafka, 'attention is the natural prayer of the soul.
COLIN CHAMBERLAIN, "The Self-Body Problem in Descartes and Malebranche.