Malecasta

Malecasta

personification of wantonness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Lust
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Opposed to Britomart's chaste constancy stand various examples of salacity, such as Lady Malecasta at the Castle Joyous.
Lady Malecasta presides over the castle, with a pack of faded busy-bodies from The Romance of the Rose as her liegemen.
She argues that The Faerie Queene in particular engages sixteenth-century cultural anxiety about female interpretive autonomy and the tendency to sexualize women's reading, using the Castle Joyous and Hellenore-Paridell episodes in book 3 to argue that Spenser endorses Britomart's correct, patriarchal reading of romance, Petrarchan, Ovidian, and historical genres, and yet presents the possibility of more subversive reading in characters such as Malecasta and Hellenore.