Malengin

Malengin

carries net on back to “catch fools with.” [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Cunning

Malengin

personification of craftiness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Deceit
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Now, in a fantasy reversal of that defeat, Malengin the smoothtongued shapechanger is tracked to his "hollow caue" (4.
15) When Byrchensa describes the Irish rebels as snakes, he comments: 'There did these snakes roule round their tales, a while, / Yet at the last were forced to cast their skinnes', possibly alluding to the destruction of Malengin which occurs when he transforms himself into a snake and Talus 'all his bones, as small as sandy grayle, / He broke, and did his bowels disentrayle' (Faerie Queene, V.
Malengin, an ingenious villain who transforms himself into different shapes at will.
On their way to the Queen they encounter the robber Malengin (Guile), who tries to escape by turning himself into various animals, but is captured and killed by Talus.