Malikshah

Malikshah

(mäl`ēkshäh), 1055–92, third sultan of the Seljuks (see TurksTurks,
term applied in its wider meaning to the Turkic-speaking peoples of Turkey, Russia, Central Asia, Xinjiang in China (Chinese Turkistan), Azerbaijan and the Caucasus, Iran, and Afghanistan.
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). In 1072 he succeeded his father to head an empire that controlled parts of Arabia, Mesopotamia, and areas near the Persian Gulf. His rule was aided by the powerful vizier, Nizam al-MulkNizam al-Mulk
, c.1018–92, vizier (1063–92) under two Seljuk (see Turks) sultans. Of Persian descent, he was early educated in administration, serving the Ghaznavids sultans. By 1059 he was chief administrator of Khorasan; in 1063 the Seljuks made him their vizier.
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. The sultan governed more by diplomacy than military conquest. Revolts erupted at the end of his reign, including one by his brother. The empire dissolved after Malikshah's death in Baghdad.
References in periodicals archive ?
after 503/1109), a second-generation student of Ibn Sina, worked with Umar al-Khayyam, Ibn Kushik, and al-Wasiti, from which we can deduce that he was part of the group of scholars whom Sultan Malikshah around 467/1074 charged to develop the so-called Jalalian calendar.
King Malikshah, in a fit of anger, stripped the Grand Vizier of all his positions and discharged him.
Twenty days later King Malikshah died, thus in less than two decades the empire collapsed," said Mr Abdrulrahman.
And al-Khdzini left a few treatises from the period of the Saljuq sultan Malikshah I (r.
Neither Alp Arslan, who soon departed for Central Asia (where he was killed), nor his son and heir, Malikshah, did anything to follow up on the victory.
Taybugha and the anonymous author of Arab Archery (on whom see the following note) show that high-volume archery depended on a very fast succession of shots, a burst rather than volley; and this "shower shooting" (as Arab Archery calls it) was a mamluk, rather than general Turkish, specialty (Ayalon's examples date from the reigns of the Seljuq sultans Malikshah and Muhammad, by which time the principal Seljuq soldiers were mamluks) of Persian - Sassanian - invention, as I discuss in "Mongol Society and Military.
Carole Hillenbrand ("The Saljuq-Isma ili Power Struggle") points out that, contrary to the popular view of the Saljuqs as dedicated upholders of Sunnism and of the Isma ilis as a constant threat to order and the true faith, the period of most intense conflict, marked by the greatest number of assassinations of political figures by Isma ilis, was a very short one, between 488/1095 and 493/1100, and peaking around 490/1097 - in other words, at that "moment of extreme disarray and weakness on the Saljuq side" which followed the removal and subsequent assassination of Nizam al-Mulk and the death of Malikshah, during which Hasan-i Sabbah was consolidating his power in the western Saljuq domains.