Majorca

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Majorca

(məjôr`kə), Span. Mallorca (mälyôr`kä), island (1991 pop. 602,074), 1,405 sq mi (3,639 sq km), Spain, largest of the Balearic Islands, in the W Mediterranean. Palma is the chief city. Majorca is mountainous in the northwest, rising to 4,739 ft (1,444 m) in the Puig Major; the south and east form a gently rolling, fertile region. Its mild climate and beautiful scenery have long made Majorca a popular resort; tourism is its major industry. Cereals, flax, grapes, and olives are grown, a light wine is produced, hogs and sheep are raised, and lead, marble, and copper are mined. For the history of Majorca before 1276, see Balearic IslandsBalearic Islands
, Span. Baleares , archipelago, off Spain, in the W Mediterranean, forming Baleares prov. (1990 pop. 767,918) of Spain; also an autonomous region since 1983. Palma is the capital. The chief islands are Majorca, Minorca, and Ibiza.
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. In 1276 the kingdom of Majorca was formed from the inheritance of James I of Majorca. It comprised the Balearic Islands, Roussillon and Cerdagne (between France and Spain), and several fiefs in S France. Perpignan, in Roussillon, was the capital. In 1343, Peter IV of Aragón took the kingdom from James II and reunited it with the crown of Aragón. The island's flourishing commerce declined, partly because of the warfare between the native peasantry and the Aragonese nobles and Catalan traders, but mainly because of the change in trade routes after the discovery of America. Majorca is known for its stalagmite caves and for its architectural treasures and prehistoric monuments. The abandoned old monastery where Chopin and George Sand lived is an island landmark. The inhabitants speak their own dialect of Catalan.

Majorca

an island in the W Mediterranean: the largest of the Balearic Islands; tourism. Capital: Palma. Pop.: 730 778 (2002 est.). Area: 3639 sq. km (1465 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ca'n Quet restaurant's tasting menu was a superb example of Mallorcan food served up with international panache, from the foie gras pate with dried figs to the scampi cauccino and suckling pig with juniper honey - the latter is the dish of choice at major festivals.
The island is building a strong reputation among the walking set, with Mallorcan authorities now realising it's a way of bringing in extra tourist cash to areas outside the traditional beach resorts and sizzling summer months.
Palma cathedral (left), a Mallorcan fisherman plies his trade (right), and the moored yachts of the rich and famous (main picture)
The island's olives and sobrassado sausage are also a real treat and the pa amb oli - bread with oil, tomato cheese or ham - a must with a glass of Mallorcan wine and we got to sample the real thing a the Son Sure Daric vineyard.
There is a thriving arts scene and a lively cafe society and around half the Mallorcan population live in the city.