mallow

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mallow,

common name for members of the Malvaceae, a family of herbs and shrubs distributed over most of the world and especially abundant in the American tropics. Tropical species sometimes grow as small trees. The family is characterized by often mucilaginous sap and by showy, five-part flowers with a prominent column of fused stamens. The true mallows (genus Malva) are native to north temperate regions of the Old World, although many species have escaped from cultivation and become naturalized in the United States. North American species, sometimes cultivated and most common in the South and West, include the false mallows (genus Malvastrum) and the rose, or swamp, mallows (genus Hibiscus) found in marshy areas across the country. Introduced species of hibiscus include the rose of Sharon, or shrubby althea (H. syriacus), a popular ornamental bush or small tree native to Asia, and okra, or gumbogumbo,
another name for okra; also applied in the W United States to a rich, black, alkaline alluvial soil, which is soapy or sticky when wet.
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 (H. esculentus), native to Africa, whose mucilaginous pods are used as a vegetable and in soups and stews. Alothea is an Old World genus. The hollyhock (A. rosea), the most popular ornamental of the family, is a Chinese perennial now widely naturalized and cultivated as a biennial or annual in many varieties of diverse colors. A. officinalis is the marsh mallow, a name sometimes used also for the larger-blossomed rose mallows. The root of the true marsh mallow, a native of Europe, has been used medicinally. It was formerly used for the confection marshmallow, which is now usually made from syrup, gelatin, and other ingredients. The tropical and subtropical flowering maple genus Abutilon, named for the maplelike foliage of some species, includes several house and bedding ornamentals. Some Asian species yield a fiber known as China jute—e.g., the velvetweed (A. theophrasti), called also Indian mallow and velvetleaf for the texture of its foliage. This plant, introduced to the United States as an ornamental, has become a noxious weed. Economically, the most important plant in the family is cottoncotton,
most important of the vegetable fibers, and the plant from which the fiber is harvested. The Cotton Plant

The cotton plant belongs to the genus Gossypium of the family Malvaceae (mallow family).
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 (genus Gossypium), with species native to both the Old and New World and cultivated independently in both areas from early times. The mallow family is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Malvales.
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mallow

mallow

Very common worldwide and highly nutritious. Whole plant is edible. The leaves have a mild, pleasant flavor. Has thickening properties so it can be used as a soup base or thickener of liquid dishes. The root can be used also. Make into a tea to sooth the membranes of the entire digestive system. You can eat them raw or dry the upper part of the plant and make a tea out of it. When it cools, it will gel up a bit because the plan contains mucilage. This gel is a soothing compound that coats mucus membranes and soothes irritated tissues, making it great for throat, sinuses, bronchitis, emphysema. stomach, intestines, colon irritation (irritable bowel, ulcerative colitis), bladder, asthma, etc. It boosts immunity and makes hair curly if you put in hair and let it dry. It softens skin and increases milk flow in nursing mothers. The root can be used as substitute for ginseng. Mallow leaf teas are used in the treatment of renal (kidney) disorders, retention of fluids and conditions of the spleen. You can eat them fresh, put them in salads, dry and powder them and put in smoothies. Make mallow shampoo and lotion by putting mallow leaves in blender with a bit of water, let sit for an hour, strain out the pulp, leaving a jelly-like goo, then add pieces of inner yucca stem, blend again and use as shampoo or skin lotion. Mallow root can be used as a toothbrush by unravelling the end like untwisting the end of rope.

Mallow

 

any one plant of the genus Malva of the family Malvaceae. It is an annual, biennial, or perennial grass with long-petiolate leaves. The flowers, which are axillary and in small groups, are purple, lilac, pink, or white. The calyx has an epicalyx. The ripened fruit breaks into monospermous segments. There are approximately 40 species, distributed in the temperate and, less commonly, subtropical zones of the northern hemisphere. About 20 species are found in the USSR, primarily near dwellings and in gardens and parks; they also grow as weeds among crops, in deserts, and sometimes in thickets and light forests.

High mallow (Malva sylvestris), dwarf mallow (M. neglecta), M. mauritiana, curled mallow (M. crispa) and other species contain carotene and vitamin C, and their leaves and young shoots are used for food. The flowers and leaves of high mallow, which are rich in mucilage, have been used as a tincture for many years to treat inflammations and irritations of the mucous membrane. A dye for wool and wine is obtained from the flowers. The species M. meluca yields a coarse fiber suitable for making string, twine, and hemp; its seeds contain a semidrying oil. Certain species of mallow yield nectar. Musk mallow (M. moschata), M. mauritiana, and M. alcea are cultivated as ornamentals. Some annual varieties that are used as animal feed are known as fodder mallows. Sometimes one species of hollyhock is called mallow.

T. V. EGOROVA


Mallow

 

several common wild plant species of the genus Malva. The best-known species are M. sylvestris, M. neglecta, and M. crispa; ornamental mallows include M. mauritiana and M.moschata.

mallow

traditional symbol of gentleness or mildness. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]

mallow

1. any plant of the malvaceous genus Malva, esp M. sylvestris of Europe, having purple, pink, or white flowers
2. any of various related plants, such as the marsh mallow, rose mallow, Indian mallow, and tree mallow
References in periodicals archive ?
The fatal shooting was on the May 24 and we thought at first Felix had been hit by a car," said Mr Mallows.
could be important, too, for promoting the establishment, growth, and reproduction of the mallows.
However, Mr Neary said, when the victim's group left the pub and headed for a kebab house, Edwards and his pal began punching Mr Mallows.
Mallows than chased his wife down the street until she reached his mother's home where she tried to phone the police.
Sold in packs of six wafers or 10 mallows, the rsp for each offering is 1.
Mr Joyce then explained that PC Mallows, Stevens and the Chapman family were all in the garden of the Chapman home when PC Mallows received a telephone call on August 17, 2002.
Mr Mallows, who runs marketing company thebestofcannock, said: "It's up to us as local people to make a difference to the survival and ongoing development of our town and a great way of doing this is by showing some real love for local businesses this February.
Innovation manager Julia Monoyioudis said the first phase of its new assault--a range of mallows and biscuits under Cadbury's Highlights hot chocolate drink banner--would tap into a key market of 25 to 45-year-old women who like to watch their weight but are reluctant to give up daily treat all together.
But on day two of his evidence at the Old Bailey, the prosecution ushered former PC Gaye Mallows into court and said she had told the family.
Kevin Mallows, aged 20, from Stanley and Neil Armstrong, also 20, from Staithes Road in Redcar died at the scene, on the M602 in Eccles, Manchester, along with colleague Simon Butterfield, 20, who was from the Wirral.
Kevin Mallows, 20, of Potter Place, in Stanley, County Durham, was one of three people killed when their car collided with the central reservation on the M602, in Eccles, on Friday.
Tree mallows (Lavatera), some native to the Mediterranean and some native to California, quickly grow to 8 or 10 feet, bloom like crazy for five to seven years or so and then suddenly die; just as these drought-tolerant plants become maintenance headaches, they die.