Malolos Constitution

Malolos Constitution

 

the fundamental law of the Philippine Republic from 1898 to 1901.

The Malolos Constitution was adopted by the Revolutionary Congress, held during October and November 1898 in the village of Barasoain near the city of Malolos. It took effect on Jan. 21, 1899. The constitution assigned to the legislative body, a unicameral national assembly, full control over the executive power (a president elected by the national assembly) and the judicial system. The constitution provided for universal and direct elections, the separation of church and state, compulsory and free education, and equal legal status for the languages of all the Philippine nationalities. It precisely delimited the rights of citizens. Of special importance was the article on nationalization (without compensation) of the real estate of the religious corporations, the largest landowners in the country. Because of the war against the Philippine Republic launched by the USA in February 1899 and the subsequent seizure of the Philippines by the USA, the constitution never became widely effective. However, it left a profound mark on the consciousness of the people, and, when the USA introduced a law in 1902 on the governance of the Philippines, several provisions from the Malolos Constitution relating to civil rights had to be adopted.

REFERENCE

Guber, A. A. Filippinskaia respublika 1898 goda i amerikanskii imperializm, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1961. (The text of the constitution is on pp. 355-66.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Araneta is the grandson of businessman-patriot Gregorio Araneta, a key player in the drafting of the Malolos Constitution, which was promulgated in 1899.
The Malolos Constitution was approved by the Congress on November 29, 1898, and submitted to Aguinaldo.
It is something that made Nick Joaquin declare that the Malolos Menu is just as significant as the Malolos Constitution, because it was tangible proof of the birth of the nation.
The 1899 Malolos Constitution provided that no Filipino shall be deprived of the right to freely express his or her ideas, or opinions, orally or in writing, through the use of the press or similar means.
The First Philippine Republic was inaugurated two days after the Malolos Constitution was promulgated on January 21, 1899.
For example, she shows the reader how elements of the Malolos Constitution reverberated in the minds and hearts of patriots such as Maximo Kalaw, who in plain sight brought these into the political discourse of the day, showing their compatibility with American practice and customs.
She said that without the First Philippine Republic, there would have been no Malolos Constitution, which she described as "the very soul and spirit of democracy and freedom that Filipinos are enjoying today.
They declared fealty to Luzon only after having been prevailed upon by Apolinario Mabini who assured them that the Malolos Constitution was provisional, promising power to the Visayas and Mindanao so they would coratify it.
The Malolos Constitution upheld democratic ideals, embodied in the distribution of powers in three separate branches of government - legislature, executive, and judiciary - and the principle that sovereignty resides in the people.
Emilio Aguinaldo promulgated the Malolos Constitution.
15, 1898, and drew up the Malolos Constitution, which became the legal framework for the Philippine government when Gen.
Nick Joaquin declared that the Malolos menu should stand alongside the Malolos Constitution as expression of the emergence of nation.