Malthus

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Malthus

Thomas Robert. 1766--1834, English economist. He propounded his population theory in An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798)
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37) It seems that Malthusians will be denied any claim of vindication absent evidence of broad-based starvation, which directly serves to reduce the entire world population.
Anti-Malthusians point to the fact that the dire predictions of latter day Malthusian zealots have failed to come true, and point to the failure of Malthusians to envision such developments as the Green Revolution and technological progress as means of accommodating an ever expanding population.
In the early 20th century, the eugenics movement took Malthusian thinking a step farther.
The Malthusians are of the view that natural resources are limited and sooner or later the human population will exceed the carrying capacity of the planet.
In the midst of these dramatic events, an internationally recognized ecologist gave a public lecture at a local ecotourism center in the Sarapiqui, claiming that recent deforestation in the area was due to the inevitable march of Malthusian reality.
Following in the footsteps of their population idol, contemporary Malthusians are as wrong as Malthus was.
What I'm mainly concerned about, though, is that unfortunately the understanding of development often does have a Malthusian undertone.
291-94; Leif Ohlsson, "Environment, Scarcity, and Conflict: A Study of Malthusian Concerns" (Ph.
When I came to NASA as its ninth Administrator in 1992, I never imagined myself leading a crusade for the Space Station, nor arguing Malthusian theory.
Sure, obesity is a problem (I wrote a book on it, The Fat of the Land), but wouldn't this have been an appropriate place to acknowledge that the Malthusian predictions put out by the Worldwatch Institute and others (such as Paul and Anne Ehrlich) were completely wrong?
Each working poor couple may well behave "rationally" by having many children; the Malthusian problem is that the effects, perhaps in quantity space on available food per person but certainly in price space on the real wage-rate, bring the well-being of all such couples back down [Sen (1967); Cassen (1978); Schultz (1981)].
Evincing complete economic ignorance, combined with blindness to demographic evidence already becoming available, Ehrlich presented a Malthusian scenario under which out-of-control population growth would lead to mass starvation.