Malvolio


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Malvolio

Olivia’s grave, self-important steward; “an affectioned ass.” [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]
See: Conceit

Malvolio

pompous, conceited steward who aspires to his mistress’s love. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Twelfth Night]
References in classic literature ?
The position of steward (manager of the estate) which Malvolio holds with Olivia was one of dignity and importance, though the steward was nevertheless only the chief servant.
The treatment given to Malvolio was the regular one for madmen; it was thought that madness was due to an evil spirit, which must be driven out by cruelty.
He smiled on me in quite a superior sort of way, such a smile as would have become the face of Malvolio, as he answered me, "The fly, my dear sir, has one striking feature.
The second Melik-meid's mate was Malvolio, the pied hound," said the Inspector.
17) Harvey's Ciceronianus does indeed contain the bizarre confession, "It is hard to believe how strangely fascinated I was by these emblems of capital letters," but whether that is enough to link Harvey to Malvolio (who does not seem at all interested in the letters for their own sake) is quite another matter.
I knew Shakespeare was one of the loves of his life and that he played a very famous Malvolio in Twelfth Night at the Liverpool Playhouse in 1971.
The first twin, Viola, falls in love with Orsino, who dotes on OIivia, who falls for Viola but is idolised by Malvolio.
Adrian Edmondson, in his RSC debut as Malvolio, brings a hilarity beyond The Young Ones but with darker intent too.
Adrian Edmondson (pictured), in his RSC debut as Malvolio, brings a hilarity beyond The Young Ones, with darker intent too.
The two scene-stealing characters of Twelfth Night, Malvolio and Sir Toby Belch, were splendidly portrayed by Jon-Paul Bowden and Lukas Lee respectively, both of whom were also called on to multi-task with supporting roles.
In the 1950s, in the East-European Communist countries, Malvolio came to embody the reactionary bourgeois individualist (Zdenek Stribny: 167); he had to have an antagonist in Maria refashioned not as a member of the parasitical feudal world, but as a working-class girl that could easily climb up the social ladder just like the communists did after the Red Army had practically occupied half of the European continent