man-hour

(redirected from Man-hours)
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man-hour

a unit for measuring work in industry, equal to the work done by one man in one hour

man-hour

[′man‚au̇r]
(industrial engineering)
A unit of measure representing one person working for one hour.

man-hour

A unit of work equal to the output of one man working for 1 hour.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whenever you complete a maintenance action, take the time to enter the correct maintenance man-hours on your maintenance form.
The Fluid handling and control specialist's pumps have run without blockages, thereby eliminating costly man-hour downtime, replacement parts and complicated maintenance procedures.
Police responded to 19 disturbance calls from August to October, requiring 161 officers and 73 man-hours and costing taxpayers $5,000 to $6000, officials said.
The key factors were the additional man-hours and driving miles associated with the pick-up of separate types of waste.
Marines and Sailors logged many man-hours, scanning old photographs for color schemes and logo placement.
Tom Laughren, quality assurance manager for Gorf Contracting in Timmins, says he is very proud of the employees at Gorf Contracting for achieving the Category 1 Award with more than 100,000 man-hours without lost-time injury in 1999 and 2000.
2m man-hours in the period 1 June 2000-31 May 2001, compared with 166m man-hours in the same period in 1998/1999, according to preliminary figures from Statistics Norway.
Kvaerner has received a safety award froni Mutual de Seguridad de la Camara Chilena de la Construccion for achieving 2M man-hours without a lost-time accident at the El Tesoro copper project in Chile.
The results of our study, taken in combination with data already published in the literature, indicate that routine histologic examination of tonsillectomy specimens is unnecessary and results only in added costs and a loss of man-hours.
The technique slashed production costs from 4 to 5 man-hours per ton to less than six-tenths of a man-hour per ton.
Blackford: We once commissioned a time-and-motion study that showed that, once the system was up and running, one facility achieved a 50% time savings in man-hours spent doing paperwork -- a $26,000 savings.
In the situation illustrated, the actual man-hours worked fell seriously short of the man-hours budgetted, and the actual efficiency of the work done was also substantially below 100%, so that the output produced (expressed in standard hours) was less than it should have been in the man-hours actually worked.