Mandeans

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Mandeans:

see MandaeansMandaeans
or Mandeans
, a small religious sect who maintain an ancient belief resembling that of Gnosticism and that of the Parsis. They are also known as Christians of St. John, Nasoraeans, Sabians, and Subbi.
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She comes from a family of practising Mandeans - members of a religion that dates back to at least the third century.
The Sabaean General Affairs Council credited Hussein for a 50 million dinar donation to its magazine, Mandean Horizons, reported Religion News Service in September.
It would seem that Arabs had cobbled together a monotheistic religion to provide theological legitimacy for themselves among their conquered Christian, Jewish, Mandean, and other sectarian subjects.
Although this is not the place to explore such connections in detail, it is worth noting that in both the early Islamic and Mandean traditions Mary appears as a strongly anti-Jewish figure, at least on occasion.
This what Hibil-Ziwa, leader of the uthras (eons) of the Mandean pantheon, says on this subject (extract from the community's sacred texts, which are in Babylo-Aramaic): `(.
TOP MANDEAN Brill celebrates with a fan after saving penalties from Jamie Hamill and Paul McCallum, below, and is hailed by his team-mates, bottom
The book is organized in seven chapters, covering stories of the Mandeans, Ezidis, Zoroastrians, Druze, Samaritans, Copts, and the Kalasha.
The Christian community from the Chaldeans, Assyrians, Mandeans and various other sects have dwelled in the Nineveh plains for more than 1700 years with Nineveh itself a centre of many biblical prophets and events.
Chapters 6-10 include a focus on Augustinian contacts with Armenian Christianity, Catholic missions to the Mandeans of Iraq, Augustinian jurisdiction issues in Basra, the Augustinian mission to Georgia, and a valuable final chapter of reflections on the mission's relationship with political power and methods.
There are non-Muslim Christians, Mandeans, Yazidis, Yarsan, Shabak, Zoroastrians, and Bahais.
One compound housed mainly Sabean Mandeans and the other was home mainly to Shia Muslims but also housed other nationalities such as Burmese.