Benoit Mandelbrot

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Benoit Mandelbrot

(person)
/ben'wa man'dl-bro/ Benoit B. Mandelbrot. The IBM scientist who wrote several original books on fractals and gave his name to the set he was discovered, the Mandelbrot set and coined the term "fractal" in 1975 from the Latin fractus or "to break".

Benoit Mandelbrot

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References in periodicals archive ?
Zaleski, "Fractals and the Weierstrass Mandelbrot function", Rose Hulman Undergraduate Mathematics Journal, vol.
James Gleick sostiene que Benoit Mandelbrot se atrevio a hacer algo que ni siquiera intentaron Newton o Galileo: anuncio que su propio trabajo era revolucionario.
Mandelbrot emphasized the presence of fractals anywhere in the surrounding nature, in human pursuits (music, painting, architecture), and not ultimately, in stock market prices.
Saupe, 1992, Fractals for the Classroom, Part 2: Complex Systems and Mandelbrot Set, New York: Springer.
The broken stick, preemption, Zipf and Mandelbrot models have been most widely used.
Never trend away: Jonathan Coulton on Benoit Mandelbrot.
2007), the other critic made money on the crash using Mandelbrot.
The three conferences memorialized the passing of Mandelbrot, widely considered the founder of fractal geometry, and the 18 papers here are a selection from all of them.
The number-size (N-S) model is proposed by Mandelbrot [15] with a difference that instead of size, the geophysical parameter such as chargeability is used.
Aiylam was a member of the National Honor Society and specialized in math competitions; he was a top qualifier in tournaments ranging from the Massachusetts Association of Math Leagues and WPI math meets to first-tier performances in Mandelbrot National Level competitions.
Some of Weatherall's subjects, such as Benoit Mandelbrot, discovered entirely new fields of inquiry (in Mandelbrot's case, fractal geometry and chaos theory) as they developed theories to solve concrete problems.
Benoit Mandelbrot created fractal geometry to help explain and organize seemingly random objects in nature such as tree branches and cloud formations.