mandible

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Related to Mandibles: mandibula, mandibular, lower jawbone, lower jaw, Lower mandible

mandible

1. the lower jawbone in vertebrates
2. either of a pair of mouthparts in insects and other arthropods that are usually used for biting and crushing food
3. Ornithol either the upper or the lower part of the bill, esp the lower part

mandible

[′man·də·bəl]
(anatomy)
The bone of the lower jaw.
The lower jaw.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various mouthparts in many invertebrates designed to hold or bite into food.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the sorry aerodynamics have a lower energy cost to the beetle than does lugging his hefty mandible muscles, which account for about 18 percent of his body weight.
Additionally, in the Synergus species the labrum does not cover at all the apices of the mandibles.
However, these color aberrations were much less striking than that of the Espanola finch, with leucism confined to the proximal end of the lower mandible and occasionally pale feathers around the head.
At the second event right of the mandible condyle head stops, then goes back in the pond by about 2 mm, at the same time left of the mandible the condyle head rapidly moves toward mandibles forward direction, until it reaches maximum aperture of dental arches.
Desomplastic fibroma of the mandible is a rare, benign but locally aggressive bone tumour that was first reported in the mandible by Griffith and Irby in 1965 (1).
In some crustaceans, including those called the phyllocarids, the mandibles were relatively tough, strengthened by the mineral calcite.
Mandibles dark brown, almost black, with deeper dentition than in N.
Also, it is possible to estimate the preyed small mammal body mass and age classes from cranial or mandible dimensions (Blem et al.
This was first described by Bhattacharya (1936) who observed juveniles of Menemerus bivattatus (Dufour 1831) (formerly Marpissa melanognathus) in India grabbing food out of the mandibles of fire ants, Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius 1804).
After removal of overlying tissue, the skulls and mandibles were then left to dehydrate and examined for phenotypic variations in structure and wear.
EVEN today, some South American tribes use the mandibles or pincers of soldier ants to heal cuts.
Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence that the end results of treatments aimed at the midface are indistinguishable from those that are designed to "grow" mandibles.