mandible

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mandible

1. the lower jawbone in vertebrates
2. either of a pair of mouthparts in insects and other arthropods that are usually used for biting and crushing food
3. Ornithol either the upper or the lower part of the bill, esp the lower part

mandible

[′man·də·bəl]
(anatomy)
The bone of the lower jaw.
The lower jaw.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various mouthparts in many invertebrates designed to hold or bite into food.
References in periodicals archive ?
The shape comparison between males and females using permutation tests with procrustes distance yielded with significant results for both skull and mandible shape.
sup][11] There is scarce information on the utility of routine periapical radiography for the identification of interalveolar foramina in mandibles.
Once torn apart by the spiny limb bases under the trunk, the mandibles would have served as a revolutionary tool to cut the flesh into small, easily digestible pieces," CAaAaAeA@dr Aria, lead author of the study, said in (https://www.
Sixty mandibles from the Institute of Teaching and Research in Forensic Sciences of Guarulhos were studied.
A total of 300 dry human adult mandibles of unknown sex with teeth intact or with preserved alveolar margins collected from Anatomy and Forensic Medicine Departments and also from the bone collections of medical students of Dhanalakshmi Srinivasan Medical College and Hospital, Perambalur, Tamilnadu, were studied.
Mandibles were dissected from 30 randomly selected worker ants from each species, mounted in a clean glass slides, covered and photographed using Leica Stereomicroscope L350 at 30X magnification dissecting microscope (Fig.
This work aims to provide a more detailed morphological differentiation of mandibles among grass and leaf-cutting species by comparing some morphometrical measurements from mandibles of two grass-cutting (A.
metallifer grows some of the most elongated mandibles among beetles.
Finite element analysis using micro-CT in cadaver mandibles has also shown that in a mandible with third molar (M3), stress is concentrated around the root apex of the third molar, which alters the concentration and propagation of stress in the mandible, which increases risk of an angle fracture.
According to the study, female choice targets male courtship rather than mandible size, and that the two traits are not physically or genetically correlated.