mandolin

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mandolin

(măn'dəlĭn`, măn`dəlĭn'), musical instrument of the lute family, with a half-pear-shaped body, a fretted neck, and a variable number of strings, plucked with the fingers or with a plectrum. The earlier mandolin, with five double strings, was developed from the mandola, a 17th-century lute. The Neapolitan mandolin, a smaller type having four pairs of strings, became popular in the 18th cent. and is the usual present-day mandolin. In popular music it is generally played with a tremolo motion. Notable uses of the mandolin in serious music are in Mozart's Don Giovanni and in pieces by Beethoven and Mahler.

Mandolin

 

a plucked string instrument. It originated in Italy, obtaining its present forms by the 17th century. Since the 18th century the mandolin has been one of the most popular folk instruments. Several types have been in existence. The most popular, the Neapolitan mandolin, has a bowl-shaped body, four pairs of strings (each pair tuned to the same note), a short neck, a fingerboard with fixed metal frets, and a flat pegbox with mechanical tuning pegs. The instrument, which is 610-635 mm long, is tuned in fifths (like the violin) and is played with a plectrum.

mandolin

, mandoline
a plucked stringed instrument related to the lute, having four pairs of strings tuned in ascending fifths stretched over a small light body with a fretted fingerboard. It is usually played with a plectrum, long notes being sustained by the tremolo
References in periodicals archive ?
8220;Music & Beauty from Italy” will share a visual collection of images of Italy taken by renowned photographer Nick Zungoli captured during trips to Tuscany, Amalfi and a dozen other locations throughout Italy accompanied by a soundtrack of classical and contemporary compositions by Italian composers performed by the New York Mandolin Ensemble.
Demand for mandolins, mandolas, octaves, and the like has never been so great.
When she heard that the island's mandolin orchestra was intending to tour the UK, one Huddersfield location immediately popped into her head, that of Holy Trinity Church, which also has a strong musical tradition.
He said when he first started making mandolins, there wasn't anyone else on the West Coast doing it, but now there are more than a dozen.
Jimmy, of Cramlington, has released three albums of his mandolin playing, and Jim, from New Hartley near Seaton Delaval, launched the Music in Schools initiative a few months ago.
Note: Mandolins are somewhat finicky and are hard to get exactly in tune.
LONG neglected and disregarded as an instrumental anachronism best left to bearded and besandalled folk musicians, the mandolin has of late being making something of a comeback.
There's a huge influx of young people learning bluegrass mandolin, fiddle, guitar and other instruments," says Ric Griffith, a member of the family that's owned the Pickin' Parlor in Granada Hills for 30 years.
Joe Brown throws in a couple of Irish mandolin jigs, bottlenecks Amazing Grace, barely rescues the 'Sing Something Simple' staple Home with a delicate Eddie Lang guitar solo, and for 'rock'n'roll' he chucks some Les Paul into Chas'n'Dave's I Wonder In Whose Arms You Are Tonight.
By autumn everyone is going to know about the beauty of this little gem in the Ionian Sea when it is seen as the backdrop to blockbuster film Captain Corelli's Mandolin, starring Nicolas Cage.
Keeping things simple, the winsome Cantrell backs her melancholy couplets with pointed acoustic guitar strums, her bass-and-drums rhythm team paring back to a hesitant shuffle, the solo licks handled by Jon Graboff on pedal steel, mandolin and guitar.
The band will perform all the music and sound effects for the film with washboards, jugs and kazoos along with guitars and mandolins.