Buthelezi

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Buthelezi

Mangosouthu Gatsha , known as Chief Buthelezi. born 1928, Zulu leader, chief minister of the KwaZulu territory of South Africa from 1970 until its abolition in 1994; founder of the Inkatha movement and advocate of Zulu autonomy; minister of home affairs from 1994
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In 1988, Greece and Turkey turned back from the brink of war by signing the 'Davos Declaration'; in 1992, the President of South Africa, FW de Klerk, met with Nelson Mandela and Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, their first summit outside South Africa; in 1999, Kofi Annan, UN Secretary-General, announced the Global Compact, to give 'a human face to the global market'; finally in 2000, Gro Harlem Brundtland, announced the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation.
Mangosuthu Buthelezi, the veteran leader of the opposition Inka- tha Freedom Party, announced last year that two of his children had died from AIDS-related causes; he publicly commended Mandela for his announcement this week.
The strength of 'Big Men' lies in its close-ups of African leaders, among them Nelson Mandela, Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, Jonas Savimbi, Dr.
They included the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) under the leadership of Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, the Conservative Party (CP), the Afrikaner Volksfront (AVF) headed by General Constant Viljoen, and the governments of the homelands of the Ciskei and Bophuthatswana.
It's handy for all the sights and was opened by Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, Chairman of the Zulu House of Chiefs.
Hearing Home Affairs minister Mangosuthu Buthelezi reminisce about how the American civil rights movement inspired Africa's freedom movements.
Former President Frederick de Klerk of the white National Party (NP) was named second vice president in Mandela's cabinet, and Inkatha's leader, Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, became home affairs minister.
The names of new cabinet members, who are due to hold their first meeting Thursday after being sworn in, have not been made public, although outgoing Home Affairs Minister Mangosuthu Buthelezi of the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) is widely tipped to be deputy president.
It is quite remarkable that this election campaign is without any of the pre-1994 violence, and this is in no small part due to Mbeki, whose abiding legacy will be the peace he struck with both the Afrikaner right wing and Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi.
Current home affairs minister and leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, Mangosuthu Buthelezi, is also cited for his role in the violence which claimed 20,000 lives in the area then known as KwaZulu.
The list, however, includes political figures across the spectrum, such as Mandela's former wife, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, and the leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party and national minister of home affairs, Mangosuthu Buthelezi.
Mangosuthu Buthelezi, the home affairs minister and long-time leader of the Zulu nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party, was also heavily criticised.