Manila hemp


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Manila hemp,

the most important of the cordage fibers. It is obtained chiefly from the Manila hemp plant (Musa textilis) of the family Musaceae (bananabanana,
name for several species of the genus Musa and for the fruits these produce. The banana plant—one of the largest herbaceous plants—is native to tropical Asia but now cultivated throughout the tropics.
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 family). It is grown mainly in its native Philippine Islands, where it has been cultivated since the 16th cent. and is known as abacá. The abacá is in no way related to the true hemp; it is of the same genus as the common banana, which it closely resembles except for the inedible fruit. At maturity the plants are cut down, and the long fibers are taken from overlapping leaves that converge at the base to form a false stem. The fibers are exceptionally strong and durable. The coarser ones are used for binder twine, matting, and rope, particularly marine cordage because of their resistance to the action of saltwater; the finer grades are woven into beautiful native fabrics and hemp hats. Manila paper is made chiefly from old Manila hemp ropes and is valuable as a strong wrapping paper. Manila hemp is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Liliopsida, order Zingiberales, family Musaceae.

Manila hemp

[mə′nil·ə ′hemp]
(botany)
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the Russian hemp and American hemp, both of which come from cannabis sativa, Manila hemp, which is locally known as abaca (Musa textilis), is a banana.
Almost all of these companies engaged in cultivation and export of Manila hemp.
The Philippines' handicraft industry enjoys several competitive advantages, among which are craftsmanship and the abundance of a variety of indigenous materials such as Manila hemp, raffia and sinamay, said Khiem Vu, program manager of the Kearny Alliance's Developing Country Export Assistance Program, which aims to assist SME manufacturers to increase their export sales.
Exporting to over 70 countries, Crompton has been closely involved with the teabag paper business ever since buying the patent, in 1938, for manufacturing long-fibered papers from Manila hemp.
The largest Japanese community in Southeast Asia thus developed in Davao with the cultivation of Manila hemp as its major industry.
Tea bag and overlay papers are made with abaca, or Manila hemp, a unique fiber grown only in the Philippines and Ecuador.
The abaca stripper was so successful that, from 1830 to 1920, abaca became known internationally as Manila hemp, and it accounted for 20-40 percent of the foreign exchange earnings of the Philippines.
The gallery's name paid homage to how the city first made an impression abroad with such products as Manila hemp and Manila paper, said Klatt, who was introduced to the Philippines in the late 1990s as a buyer for his own German-based company.