Mantinea


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Mantinea

(măn'tĭnē`ə), city of ancient Greece, in E central Arcadia (now Arkadhía). In the Peloponnesian War a coalition led by Mantinea and Argos and urged on by Athens was defeated (418 B.C.) by Sparta at Mantinea. It was also the scene of the victory of Thebes over Sparta in which EpaminondasEpaminondas
, d. 362 B.C., Greek general of Thebes. He was a pupil of Lysias the Pythagorean, but his early life is otherwise obscure. As the Theban delegate to the peace conference of 371 B.C. he refused to surrender his claim to represent all Boeotia.
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 was killed (362 B.C.).

Mantinea

 

an ancient Greek city in the province of Arcadia, in which region on June 27 (or July 3), 362 B.C., a battle took place between the troops of the Boeotian League, headed by Thebes under the command of Epaminondas, and troops of the anti-Boeotian coalition (Sparta, Athens, Mantinea, and other cities), under the command of the Spartan king Agesilaus II.

Epaminondas, developing a new tactic which he had employed at Leuctra, disposed his troops in an oblique battle order with a strong attack group on the left flank opposite the forces of the enemy, which were evenly dispersed along the entire front. The attack group and the cavalry of the Theban forces smashed the right wing of the allies and crowded in their center. The Thebans were close to victory, but at the battle’s decisive moment Epaminondas was mortally wounded, and his troops re-treated in confusion. The battle at Mantinea was the conclusion of the Boeotian League’s ascendancy in Greece (it had begun only in 379 B.C.).

Mantinea

, Mantineia
(in ancient Greece) a city in E Arcadia; site of several battles
References in periodicals archive ?
The name Diotima means 'honored by Zeus', and the mention of the city of Mantinea in the grammatical form it appears in here, is identical with the word for science of divining.
Additionally, Jabra's wide-ranging erudition in both Eastern and Western cultures is reflected in this novel, which incorporates Greek and Near Eastern (Gilgamesh) mythologies, references to Arab literature and history and to Ottoman history and British rule, as well as to Western painters, musicians, litterateurs, and thinkers such as Andrea Mantinea, Purcell and Mozart, Shakespeare and Keats, La Fontaine, T.
Through a fine treatment of the relevant sections of Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War, Schmid makes clear how these flaws also led to the failures of courage by Laches at the battle of Mantinea and by Nicias in the Sicilian campaign (sections 4.