plume

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Related to Mantle plume: rift valley

plume

1. Biology any feathery part, such as the structure on certain fruits and seeds that aids dispersal by wind
2. Geology a rising column of hot, low viscosity material within the earth's mantle, which is believed to be responsible for linear oceanic island chains and flood basalts

plume

[plüm]
(analytical chemistry)

plume

Wood veneer having a large featherlike figure, usually cut from a crotch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the small volumes and slow eruption rates, an origin due to the impact of a proper mantle plume is unlikely for the magmatic rocks in the Baltic Sea region and NE Poland.
Mantle plumes can apparently trigger continental breakups, softening the tectonic plates from below until they fragment - this is how the lost continent of Eastern Gondwana ended about 170 million years ago, prior research suggests.
No evidence for a thermal anomaly exists in the TWVF region, but geophysical characteristics of the Pratt--Welker chain are consistent with a mantle plume origin (Lambeck et al.
Volcanoes from mantle plumes develop differently than their subduction-zone brethren do.
4]He ratios in some OIBs (and solar Ne isotopes) was attributed to small amounts of primitive, noble-gas-rich lower mantle being entrained by mantle plumes rising from the 670 km boundary.
1991, Hotspots, mantle plumes, flood basalts, and true polar wander: Reviews of Geophysics, v.
If this widespread magmatism is related to rifting and break-up of the Superior craton, perhaps related to arrival of a mantle plume underneath the western part of this craton, why do we find mafic sills of identical age (1883 [+ or -] 5 Ma; R.
This recycled oceanic crust was present in the plume as eclogite, a very dense rock that made the hot mantle plume less buoyant.
Events are inferred to have a mantle plume origin if a giant radiating dyke swarm is present.
Their new results describe a clear connection between the arrival of a powerful mantle plume head around 70 million years ago and the rapid motion of the Indian plate that was pushed as a consequence of overlying the plume's location.
Results of the project indicate a strong case for the existence of a deep mantle plume, which has fundamental implications-not just for Hawaii, but more generally for the form of convection in the solid Earth, Earth's composition with depth, its evolution over geologic time and how the earth releases heat.
Scientists believe mantle plumes can last hundreds of millions of years, and that their heat can create phenomena such as Yellowstone National Park or the string of Hawaiian Islands.