plume

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plume

1. Biology any feathery part, such as the structure on certain fruits and seeds that aids dispersal by wind
2. Geology a rising column of hot, low viscosity material within the earth's mantle, which is believed to be responsible for linear oceanic island chains and flood basalts

plume

[plüm]
(analytical chemistry)

plume

Wood veneer having a large featherlike figure, usually cut from a crotch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the small volumes and slow eruption rates, an origin due to the impact of a proper mantle plume is unlikely for the magmatic rocks in the Baltic Sea region and NE Poland.
There are all these little slivers of continent that may peel off continents when the hotspot of a mantle plume passes under them," Hartz said.
Currently, the conventional model among petrologists is that komatiites are high temperature, low viscosity melts produced by high degrees of anhydrous melting of mantle plumes.
Washington, March 15 (ANI): A geochemist of Indian origin has determined that an active African volcano possesses the most fluid lava in the world, which points toward its source being a mantle plume that is in complete pristine condition.
1991, Hotspots, mantle plumes, flood basalts, and true polar wander: Reviews of Geophysics, v.
I have been interested in mantle plumes from the core/mantle boundary since they were first hypothesized in 1971.
Going back in time, it is possible that mantle plumes may have played a more significant role, although this remains uncertain.
We review proposed links between the LIP record of Canada and mantle plumes, continental breakup, regional uplift, and ore deposits.
These include: the major ridges in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans; "axial hotspots' at Iceland, the Azores and the Galapagos Islands, where large mantle plumes had arisen; spreading ridges in the small seas behind subduction zones, where one plate plunges beneath another; and small, isolated ridges such as the Cayman Rise in the Caribbean.
HARD EVIDENCE In the 1960s, scientists first conceived of mantle plumes as long cylinders of buoyant rock that gradually flatten and spread into mushroom shapes as the molten masses rise through the mantle.
These chemical distinctions provide clues to understand the underlying mantle plumes that create the islands.