plume

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plume

1. Biology any feathery part, such as the structure on certain fruits and seeds that aids dispersal by wind
2. Geology a rising column of hot, low viscosity material within the earth's mantle, which is believed to be responsible for linear oceanic island chains and flood basalts

plume

[plüm]
(analytical chemistry)

plume

Wood veneer having a large featherlike figure, usually cut from a crotch.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were using computer simulations to see how the geology of the western United States may have evolved over the last 20 million years and found "little support for the traditional mantle plume hypothesis," according to the (https://news.
A volcano forms on a tectonic plate above a mantle plume.
Although the relation between these magmatic provinces and igneous activity in the Baltic Sedimentary Basin area are unclear, the latter might be related alternatively to (i) mantle plume activity or/and (ii) wrenching extension resulting from strike-slip movements along the Tornquist Zone in the west.
REGIONAL GRAVIMETRIC RESPONSE OF THE HAWAIIAN MANTLE PLUME
Mantle plumes can apparently trigger continental breakups, softening the tectonic plates from below until they fragment - this is how the lost continent of Eastern Gondwana ended about 170 million years ago, prior research suggests.
Traditionally, alkalic lavas in oceanic settings are associated with Hawaiian-type mantle plumes that tap enriched mantle sources (e.
Some of the radial surface fracture patterns associated with the novae and coronae on Venus are almost certainly similar features that have been formed more recently in that planet's geologic history, and on Mars the systems of linear graben, some of which show evidence of localized eruptive vents, extending radially from large shield volcanoes, also bear witness to the presence of long-lived mantle plumes generating giant dike swarms.
Hart is a geologist and isotope geochemist whose recent research has focused on the origin of hot spots and mantle plumes and on the dynamics and evolution of the deep Earth.
The mantle plumes have produced up to 26 cubic kilometers of oceanic basalt each year during the last 150 million years.
com/hot-mantle-plume-melting-antarctica-beneath-nasa-study-finds-2612488) mantle plumes are responsible for bringing some of the gold from deep within Earth up to shallower depths from where it could be mined.
Seamounts are a result of intraplate volcanism, which can be fed from deep mantle plumes or the upper mantle through lithosphere structures (Courtillot et al.