Mantua

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Mantua

(măn`cho͞oə, –to͞oə), Ital. Mantova, city (1991 pop. 53,065), capital of Mantova prov., Lombardy, N Italy, bordered on three sides by lakes formed by the Mincio River. It is an agricultural, industrial, and tourist center. Manufactures include machinery, metals, furniture, and refined petroleum. Originally an Etruscan settlement, Mantua was later a Roman town and afterward a free commune (12th–13th cent.). It flourished under the GonzagaGonzaga
, Italian princely house that ruled Mantua (1328–1708), Montferrat (1536–1708), and Guastalla (1539–1746). The family name is derived from the castle of Gonzaga, a village near Mantua.
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 family (1328–1708), who were magnificent patrons of the arts. Mantua passed to Austria in 1708, was taken by Napoleon I in 1797, was retaken by Austria in 1815, and was returned to Italy in 1866. The Gonzaga palace (13th–18th cent.), among the largest and finest in Europe, has frescoes by Mantegna and Giulio Romano and numerous other works of art. Other landmarks include the Palazzo del Te (1525–35); the Church of Sant' Andrea (15th–18th cent.), designed by Alberti, where Mantegna is buried; and the law courts (13th cent.).

Mantua

 

(also Mantova), a city in Northern Italy, in Lombardy. It is located on an island in a lake-like widening of the Mincio River, near its confluence with the Po. It is the capital of the province of Mantua. Population, 65,900 (1971); river port and railroad junction. Industrial activities include oil refining and the production of petrochemicals. Other important products are agricultural machinery, ceramics, paper, furniture, silk, and sugar.

Mantua, which was founded by the Etruscans, is the site of the Accademia Virgiliana (Vergilian Academy of Arts and Sciences). Nearby is the little town of Pietole (known in ancient times as Andes), which is considered to be the birthplace of Vergil. During the 15th and 16th centuries, Mantua was one of the centers of the Italian Renaissance. Between 1628 and 1631 a war was fought for the territory of Mantua and Montferrat.

Mantua has many noteworthy medieval architectural monuments. On the Piazza delle Erbe are located the Rotunda di San Lorenzo (11th century), the Palazzo della Ragione (1250), and the Palazzo Broletto (1227-73). The Piazza Sordello is the site of the Palazzo Bonacolsi (13th century) and the cathedral (rebuilt in 1545 by Giulio Romano). Also in Mantua are the Palazzo Ducale complex, which is now a museum (1290-1708; including the apartments of Isabella d’Este, 16th century), and the Castle of St. George (1395-1406, architect Bartolino Ploti da Novara; including the Camera degli Sposi with frescoes by Mantegna, 1474). Renaissance churches in the city include San Sebastiano (1460) and Sant’ Andrea (1472-94), which were both designed by L. B. Alberti and executed by the architect L. Fancelli. There are several buildings by Giulio Romano in Mantua, including the Palazzo di Giustizia (1530) and the Palazzo del Te (1525-34). Another noteworthy building in the city is the Palazzo del Accademia Virgiliana (facade by architect G. Piermarini, 1773).

REFERENCE

Mantova: La storia, le lettere, le arti, vols. 1-9. Mantua, 1958-65.

Mantua

a city in N Italy, in E Lombardy, surrounded by lakes: birthplace of Virgil. Pop.: 47 790 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
An open-minded but conservative intellectual among his peers and friends with the spirituali who looked aside as Bernardino Ochino fled Italy, he nevertheless reformed the Mantuan diocese with an eye to maintaining decorum and social order and brooked no tolerance of Lutheran discussions among his flock.
AH, good old Mantuan, I may speak of thee as the traveller doth of Venice: Venetia, Venetia, Chi non ti vedo, non ti pretia.
In the novel Jasmine Belart is the female counterpart of Celestino Lometto, a Mantuan parvenu industrialist and producer of pantyhose.
Virgil's page / Or claim the Muses with the Mantuan Sage" (Wheatley 10) - two references to Virgil (Oxford Classical Dictionary 936) - while in "A Hymn to the Morning" she invokes Calliope, the muse of epic poetry (Wheatley 56).
The historical Sordello, for example, was born in a small village near Mantua, a fact that did not prevent Dante's Sordello from embracing Virgil as a fellow Mantuan.
Brown, "A Ferrarese Lady and a Mantuan Marchesa: The Art and Antiquities Collections of Isabella d'Este Gonzaga (1474-1539)," 53-7, in Cynthia Lawrence, ed.
Sotheby's 8 December Old Master Sculpture and Works of Art sale unveils a 16th-century gilded and silvered bronze figure of a seated nymph only recently identified as the work of the famous Mantuan goldsmith and sculptor known as Antico.
Given Lorenzo de Medici's involvement with Florentine religious orders, Bregoli Russo suggests questions about the influence of members of these orders, who were associated with other courts in Italy, for example Fra Filippo Lapaccini and Gentile Becchi, both with Mantuan connections.
As for the intercession of the Mantuan court, by November 1584 Angelo Grillo wrote Tasso a letter mentioning his hope that Duchess Leonora and her son Vincenzo, along with Duchess Lucrezia of Urbino, might aid in Tasso's release--and Tasso's first three letters back to him all emphasized Leonora.
Talbot defends the decision to take this approach at the beginning of the first section on the individual works in the Mantuan cantatas.
The Friar and the unnamed Mantuan apothecary in Romeo and Juliet represent two historical moments in this transformation, and their juxtaposition underscores Shakespeare's skeptical attitude toward both drug cultures.
Nuptial Voices: The Power of Song in the 1608 Mantuan Wedding Festivities.