Chrysoloras, Manuel

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Chrysoloras, Manuel

(krĭsəlôr`əs), c.1350–1415, Greek teacher and writer, b. Constantinople. Traveling to Italy on a diplomatic mission, he became celebrated for his teaching and introduced Greek literature into Florence and other Italian cities. Among his works were a Greek grammar, translations of Plato and Homer, and a Comparison of the Old and New Rome, an important source on the survival and placement of monuments in Rome and Constantinople. His pupils included a number of the finest early Renaissance scholars. Through Chrysoloras's teaching, the culture of classical Greece became the foundation of humanist studies in the West.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speech delivered at the 7th Manuel Chrysoloras Internatonal Lecture, Athens, 26th June, [http://www.
3) Former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Malta Michael Frendo, A voice for Europe in the Mediterranean--Challenges and Opportunities, Speech delivered at the 7th Manuel Chrysoloras Internatonal Lecture, Athens, 26th June 2009, accessed on 15 September 2013, [http://www.
But he became acquainted with Coluccio Salutati, who suggested that he study Greek with Manuel Chrysoloras, the learned Byzantine diplomat whom Coluccio brought to Florence in 1397.
On the whole, Monfasani may be right, but he remains silent on an essential motivation of at least some of the Greeks who went to Italy, such as Manuel Chrysoloras and Bessarion.
12) The richest and probably most learned of the oligarchs, Palla di Nofri Strozzi, had studied with Bruni under Manuel Chrysoloras.
7v-9r) praises, among moderns, Dante, Petrarch, Manuel Chrysoloras, Bruni, and some others (fol.
The first complete Latin translation of this work was undertaken by the Byzantine scholar Manuel Chrysoloras while he was apostolic secretary to Gregory XII, and completed by Iacopo Angeli da Scarperia (Jacopo d'Angelo), also an apostolic secretary, who translated its title as the Cosmographia.
6) It is very likely that Palla Strozzi (1372-1462) was given this Plotinus manuscript by his Greek master, Manuel Chrysoloras, whom Coluccio Salutati had called to Florence in 1397 in order to appoint him as the first teacher of Greek.