manueline


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manueline

(mənwĕl`ēn, –īn), sumptuous, composite Portuguese style of architectural ornamentation of the early 16th cent. It combined contemporary Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and Flemish elements and was named for King Manuel I of Portugal (reigned 1495–1521). The Chapter House of the Convent of Christ at Tomar, Portugal (early 16th cent.), with its large-scale windows surrounded with sculptured organic and twisted rope forms, is the major monument of the manueline style. The style was extended to the decorative arts and spread to Spain, Mexico, and India.
References in periodicals archive ?
57) In the process the world was introduced to a new style of architecture, which later became known as the Manueline style, and which combined botanical ornamentation, nautical elements and the armillary sphere with gothic structures.
It is known for its colonialist history, original Fado music and the ornate Manueline architecture.
Due deference to Vasco Da Gama and Pedro Alvarez Cabral is celebrated in Manueline stonework.
Take in the exquisite tile work in the refectory of the Jeronimos Monastery, considered the best example of Manueline architecture in the city.
Aksam evde BDAE'nin manueline bakarak, bulgularimi ve sonucu bir rapor halinde yazdim.
From the moment you leave the Atlantic Ocean you sail up the River Tagus where you are greeted with some of Lisbon's finest examples of architecture, from the striking Manueline Belem Tower to the statue of Christ the King and the breathtaking 25th of April Bridge.
This boom financed the flamboyant Manueline art, Portugal's answer to the renaissance.
Finally, Peninsular art rose in a mighty flight, with the so-called Manueline architecture, a production of surprising originality and grace, and with the brilliant school of Spanish painting, immortalized by artists such as Murillo, Velazquez and Ribera.
24) These instructions clearly state the Manueline policies to provide incentives for Portuguese to settle in India, marry, procreate, and engage in commerce and crop cultivation.
The royal marriage took place in Lisbon on April 23 1662 by proxy, and portraits of the newlyweds were carried through the streets of the town, as custom demanded, in solemn process beneath triumphal arches after a Catholic mass at the Manueline Abbey of St Jerome at Belem.
The city is testament to its heritage, from the Manueline buildings in BelAm to the medieval Alfama and the Neoclassical Baixa district.
There is even a tile museum in Lisbon - the Museu Nacional do Azulejo - housed in the cloisters of a Manueline convent, which contains some extraordinary examples of the art that has made such a poetic contribution to Portugal's buildings and cities.