many-worlds interpretation

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Related to Many-worlds: Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics

many-worlds interpretation

[¦men·ē ′wərlz ‚in·tər·prə‚tā·shən]
(quantum mechanics)
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32) For an in-depth discussion of the Copenhagen interpretation versus many-worlds interpretation, see Max Tegmark, "The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: Many Worlds or Many Words?
This causal loop could have been avoided by invoking a many-worlds cosmology: in this scenario, Henry would travel to a parallel world; Clare would fall in love with the stranger, and when she grows up, she would meet a counterpart of Henry--let's call him Henry II--with whom she would also fall in love because of his resemblance with the time traveler.
Dan Simmons's The Hollow Man (1992) revisits the old problem of telepathic union and teleportation in light of a host of complex theories: quantum theory, Everett's many-worlds theory, chaos theory.
The other reading the author calls "the many-worlds interpretation.
In the many-worlds interpretation the cat remains alive in one world, dies in the other.
For example, the most serious alternative to the design hypothesis is the many-worlds hypothesis, in which one postulates infinite universes to explain the order of just one universe.
Later, however, he concedes that the many-worlds interpretation can be patched up with an argument supposing that the number of "heads" universes created is nine times greater than the number of "tails" universes created.
A unique and wonderful night that covered all sorts of science including the many-worlds theory which says there are infinite universes where every possible outcome is played out.
E's father came up with the Many-Worlds interpretation, a branch of quantum mechanics that implies all possible alternative histories and futures are real.
To bridge this gap between theory and observed reality, different interpretations of Quantum Mechanics have been suggested, ranging from the conventional Copenhagen interpretation to Hidden-variables and Many-worlds interpretations.
Eyes continue to pop as I explain the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, which suggests that every possibility is actualized--that "reality" is continually "splitting" into many different realities that are separated from each other.