Manyoshu

Manyoshu

 

the first anthology of Japanese poetry (second half of the eighth century), reflecting the transition from song to written poetry.

The Manyoshu consists of 20 scrolls and includes 4,516 poems, consisting of love lyrics, nature lyrics, odes, elegies, and verse on legendary, social, and everyday themes. The “short song,” or tanka, occupies a predominant place in the anthology. The Manyoshu includes such well-known poets as Kakinomoto no Hitomaro (late seventh and early eighth centuries), Yamabe no Akahito (first half of the eighth century), and Otomo no Yakamochi (718-785), as well as folk poetry. It has great importance as an early poetical work that laid the foundations for the entire subsequent development of Japanese poetry.

REFERENCES

Manyoshu. In the series “Nihon koten bungaku taikei.” Toyko, 1958.
In Russian translation:
In Iaponskie piatistishiia. Moscow, 1971.
Man”esiu: Sobranie miriad list’ev, vols. 1-3. Introduction and commentary by A. E. Gluskina. Moscow, 1971-72.
References in periodicals archive ?
Others take the event more seriously and venture to nearby Yoshino (about an hour southeast of Kyoto by train), whose waterfalls and cedars were extolled in the eighth century Manyoshu poetry collection:
OTSU, Japan - The educational committee of the city of Koka, Shiga Prefecture, said Thursday a famous poem from the Manyoshu, the earliest existing collection of Japanese poetry, was found written on an ancient writing implement made of wood unearthed locally in 1997.
The implement, called a ''mokkan,'' is the first such item bearing a Manyoshu poem, according to the committee.
The Japanese tradition of unmediated experience of natural phenomena, as expressed in the early poetry of the Manyoshu and later critically presented by Motoori Norinaga, establishes the enduring presence of the natural world.
collected in the eighth-century anthology Manyoshu [TEXT NOT
The Manyoshu was the product of a committee that worked for more than a century on a project that was, in the end, never completed.
All the examples in this paper are taken from Manyoshu (Kojima et al.
I've composed these twenty-one poems(1) by collaging lines and phrases from the Kokinshu and the Manyoshu.
A 256 Mb DRAM can hold more than 25,000 pages of double-spaced (for Europe 16,000 pages one and one-half line spaced) typewritten text, or the equivalent of the entire works of William Shakespeare, plus those of Johann Wolfgang Goethe, as well as the Manyoshu, the Kokinshu and the Tale of Genji.
Only three publishers, including Fuso Publishing, mention Emperor Showa and Kakinomoto no Hitomaro (ca 685-705), the most important poet whose work is contained in the Manyoshu (Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves), the earliest anthology of Japanese verse.