Manzikert


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Manzikert

(măn`zĭkərt), Turk. Malazgirt, village, E Turkey, SE of Erzurum. It was an important town of ancient Armenia. A council held there in A.D. 726 reasserted the independence of the Armenian Church from the Orthodox Eastern Church. There, in 1071, the Seljuk Turks under Alp ArslanAlp Arslan
, 1029–72, Seljuk sultan of Persia (1063–72). In 1065 he led the Seljuks in an invasion of Armenia and Georgia and in 1066 attacked the Byzantine Empire. The success of his campaign was crowned (1071) by his brilliant victory over Romanus IV at Manzikert.
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 routed the troops of Byzantine Emperor Romanus IVRomanus IV
(Romanus Diogenes) , d. 1072, Byzantine emperor (1068–71). A Cappadocian general, he succeeded Constantine X by marrying his widow, Eudocia Macrembolitissa.
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 in a decisive battle that resulted in the fall of Asia Minor to the Seljuks.

Manzikert

 

a fortress in Asia Minor (near Lake Van, on the eastern boundary of the Byzantine Empire), at whose walls a battle occurred on Aug. 19, 1071, between the armies of the Byzantine emperor Romanus IV Diogenes and the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan.

At first the Byzantines succeeded in pressing the Seljuks, but then, as a result of sedition among the Byzantine troops (betrayal by the Ducas clique, which was hostile to the emperor), the army of Romanus IV was defeated, and he himself was taken prisoner (he was released on condition that he pay an annual tribute). The Victory at Manzikert hastened the establishment of Seljuk dominance in Asia Minor.

REFERENCES

Istoriia Vizantii, vol. 2. Moscow, 1967. Pages 284-87.
Guseinov, R. A. “Posledstviia srazheniia pri Mantsikerte (1071) dlia Zakavkaz’ia.” In the collection Vizantiiskii vremennik, vol. 29. Moscow, 1969.
References in periodicals archive ?
Battle of Manzikert is one of the top ten battles that changed the face of the world's history.
2071 will mark one thousand years since the Battle of Manzikert," when the Seljuk Turks defeated the Byzantine Empire and heralded the advent of the Ottoman one, according to Fradkin and Libby.
David Nicolle's MANZIKERT 1071: THE BREAKING OF BYZANTIUM (9781780965031, $21.
Baki Tezcan, who is researching Ottoman history in Istanbul, said Turkey traces its history to Manzikert, a battle in 1071 in which Turks defeated a Byzantine force in what is eastern Turkey today.
The focus of this book is the famous Byzantine-Saljuq confrontation at Manzikert (Malazgirt in Modern Turkish) in 1071 "as it is depicted in the surviving Arabic and Persian sources" (p.
Seven decisive battles are described: Yarmuk in 636 (marking the end of Byzantine rule in Syria), Poitiers in 732 (where the Muslim advance into France was halted), Manzikert in 1071 (marking the defeat of Christian Anatolia), Hattin in 1187 (where Saladin routed the Crusaders), Las Navas de Tolosa in Spain in 1212 (altering the balance of power between the Christian north and Muslim Andalusia), the capture of Constantinople in 1453 (leading eventually to the Ottoman Empire), and the siege of Malta in 1565 (marking the end of Turkish supremacy in the Mediterranean).
Written by Russian Orthodox priest Andrew Louth, Greek East and Latin West: The Church AD 681-1071 is the third volume of "The Church in History" series and continues the scholarly accounting, from the end of the Sixth Ecumenical Synod in 681 to the Battle of Manzikert in 1071.
Except for Justinian's wars against the Western barbarians, the Byzantine Empire's thousand-year history unfolds offstage: the watershed Battle of Manzikert in 1071 is not even mentioned.
O'Shea tells a broad story of Christian and Islamic conflict during the medieval period, organizing it around a handful of battles: Yarmuk (636), Poitiers (732), Manzikert (1071), Hattin (1187), Las Navas de Tolosa (1212), Constantinople (1453) and Malta (1565).
Hillenbrand: On the one hand, in the last few decades of the 11th century, successive popes and European kings had heard with increasing alarm about the disastrous defeat of the Byzantine army at the hands of the nomadic Seljuq Turks at the battle of Manzikert near Lake Van in eastern Turkey in 1071.
It is, in fact, rather amusing to imagine oneself wandering around in old Carthage or fighting at Manzikert.
In 1071, the Seljuks defeated the Byzantine Empire at the Battle of Manzikert.