Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge


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Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge

Address:24141 KS Hwy 52
Pleasanton, KS 66075

Phone:913-352-8956
Web: maraisdescygnes.fws.gov
Established: 1992.
Location:On KS Highway 52, just north of Pleasanton, Kansas.
Facilities:Wildlife viewing sites.
Activities:Hunting, fishing, boating (with restrictions), hiking.
Special Features:The refuge is named after the Marais des Cygnes River, which runs through the middle of the refuge and is the dominant natural feature of the region. French for "Marsh of the Swans," the refuge was presumably named for trumpeter swans that were once a common sight here during their spring and fall migrations.
Habitats: 7,500 acres composed of the river and its adjacent streams and wetlands, bottomland hardwood forests, grasses, upland shrub and trees, cropland, and savanna.
Access: Daylight hours year round.
Wild life: Kentucky warbler, northern parula warbler, red shouldered hawk, turkey vulture, scissor-tailed flycatcher, and painted bunting.

See other parks in Kansas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through that program, nearly 100,000 trees have been planted and 262 acres restored at three national wildlife reserves, including Lower Rio Grande Valley along the Texas Gulf Coast, Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas and Red River National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana.
When Bruce Freske sees 20 to 30 eagles winter at the Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas, he is not only fascinated, he is impressed.
At Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas, eagle populations are at "historic highs," according to the refuge manager A Global ReLeaf planting of 60,000 trees may help bring eagles there to nest as welt
Public-Private Partnership Helps Fight Climate Change, Restore Habitat with 234,000 Trees at Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge
Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge, Mississippi; 25,750 trees at Little Red Creek burn site, Caspar, Wyoming; 406,490 trees at Pointe Remove Wildlife Management Area, Arkansas; 44,000 trees at Three Sisters Bald Eagle Winter Roost, California; 58,800 trees at Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge, Kansas; 147,400 trees at Red River County, Texas.