Marajó

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Marajó

(mərəzhô`), island, c.150 mi (240 km) long and c.100 mi (160 km) wide, N Brazil, at the mouth of the Amazon River. It divides the river into the Amazon proper and the Pará. Cattle are raised on the extensive eastern grasslands, and water buffaloes are bred in the low, swampy west. The island is famous for its prehistoric mounds, which yield handsome pottery.

Marajó

 

a low-lying island in Brazil at the mouth of the Amazon River between one of the Amazon’s northern branches, the Pará River in the south, and the MarajÓ Bay in the southeast. Area, approximately 48,000 sq km. The western part is covered with dense evergreen forest containing valuable timber; in the east there is palm savanna with flooded meadows and swamps. There is timber industry in the west and livestock raising for meat in the east.

References in periodicals archive ?
Only two other apparently isolated populations of this cerrado-specialist woodcreeper (all belonging to the "bivittatus" group) are known for Amazonia: (1) Surinam, and (2) Brazilian states of Amapa and Pardi, where it occurs on both banks of the lower Amazon River Valley between Santarrm and Marajo Island (several MPEG specimens; Henriques and Oren 1997, Sanaiotti and Cintra 2001, Marantz et al.
For those engaged in research in the tropical lowlands of South America, Rostain's book is no doubt a worthy addition to specialist libraries, to be placed either alongside classic works on pre-Columbian agricultural engineering, or among archaeological studies of the Orinoco, the Guianas and Marajo Island.
In the flooded areas of the Amazon periphery--the Baures region of Bolivia, and on Marajo island, located at the estuary of the Amazon river (Figure 1)--Steward and Meggers supposed the undeniable signs of social complexity to have resulted from migration from the Andean highlands.
The Camutins chiefdom: rise and development of complex societies on Marajo Island, Brazilian Amazon.
The non-agricultural chiefdoms of Marajo Island, in H.
Centred on Marajo Island, in the delta of the Amazon River, the archaeological culture known as Marajoara was first identified at the end of the 19th century.
In a polemical conclusion, Brochado proposes that the mound-building societies which settled in Marajo Island in the 4th-13th centuries AD were ancestors of the Tupinamba.
In his master's thesis (1980), Brochado presents a model of intensive cultivation of seed- and root-crops able to support the mound-building societies of eastern Marajo Island over several hundred years.
For instance, in a reinterpretation of the Marajo Island sequence (Meggers & Danon 1988), it has been suggested that gaps between the latest TL date for the Mangueiras phase (2870[+ or -]190) and the earliest available TL date for the Formiga phase (1940[+ or -]230) that could be correlated with an arid interval, inferred from pollen data from Marajo and elsewhere from c.
Roosevelt's work on the earth mounds of Marajo Island (1991a) re-evaluated Meggers & Evans's (1957) sequence of the Marajoara phase with geophysical remote sensing and - for the first time in the Brazilian Amazon - recovery of microbotanical remains.
Along the Para State shore, not far from Marajo Island, and in many areas of southern Brazil, hundreds of shell-mounds have been identified and some excavated (Prous 1992: 199-265).
Identification and implications of a hiatus in the archaeological sequence on Marajo Island, Brazil, Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences 78(3): 245-53.