Marburg School


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Marburg School

 

a trend in neo-Kantianism of the late 19th century in Germany.

The Marburg school was founded by H. Cohen and P. Natorp, professors at the University of Marburg. F. A. Lange was a forerunner of the Marburg school. Members of the school included A. Buchenau, A. Gb’rland, and W. Kinckel and, initially, E. Cassirer and N. Hartmann. Distinct from the Baden school of neo-Kantianism, which was concerned with the problem of values, the Marburg School dealt, for the most part, with epistemology, logic, and methodology.

References in periodicals archive ?
The philosophers who cut their teeth on the debate include Trendelenburg's student, the founder of the Marburg school, Hermann Cohen, and Fischer's student, one of the founders of the Baden school, Wilhelm Windelband.
The Marburg School, beginning with Cohen, attempted to divorce the epistemic conditions for the unity of consciousness from psychological or naturalist explanations.
While both the new logicists and the heirs to the Marburg school opposed positivism and empiricism, as Russell's program unfolded it moved closer to empiricism than to the Neo-Kantian project.
Influenced by the Marburg School of neo-Kantian philosophy and phenomenology, Sesemann also stood quite close to Russian Formalism, and was ahead of his time in more than one way.