Marburg virus

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Related to Marburg hemorrhagic fever: viral hemorrhagic fever, African hemorrhagic fever

Marburg virus:

see hemorrhagic feverhemorrhagic fever
, any of a group of viral diseases characterized by sudden onset, muscle and joint pain, fever, bleeding, and shock from loss of blood. Bleeding occurs in the form of leakage from capillaries in the internal organs and the skin and mucous membranes.
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Marburg virus

[′mär‚bu̇rg ‚vī·rəs]
(virology)
A large virus transmitted to humans by the grivet monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Response to imported case of Marburg hemorrhagic fever, the Netherlands.
Confirmed cases of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever have been reported in about six African nations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with fatality rates of 80 percent to 90 percent.
Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) is a rare viral hemorrhagic fever caused by Marburg virus (a filovirus in the same family as Ebola virus), which is endemic in tropical areas of Africa and likely is maintained in nature by cave-dwelling bats.
The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever and enlists all their major and minor projects
In July 2008 in the Netherlands, an imported case of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) (7) was diagnosed in a person after possible exposure in a bat cave in Uganda.
Serosurvey on household contacts of Marburg hemorrhagic fever patients.
An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever ran a protracted course in the gold-mining village of Durba, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, from October 1998 through September 2000.
An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever in Durba in northeastern DRC from October 1998 through September 2000 was the first large outbreak in rural areas under natural conditions (154 cases, CFR 83%).
Symptoms in 121 household and community contacts within 4 weeks after exposure to a Marburg hemorrhagic fever patient, Watsa Subdistrict, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2002 No.
Frequency of risk factors for Marburg hemorrhagic fever in pygmies and nonmining general population residing in the Watsa Health Zone, Democratic Republic of Congo Male Female pygmies pygmies (n = 150) (n = 150) Risk factors (%) (%) p * Primary transmission risk factors Subsistence activities Hunting 100 20 <0.
Financial support for the investigation of Marburg hemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, of which this study was a part, was received from the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the United States Agency for International Development.
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and Marburg hemorrhagic fever have occurred in Europe.