Marcuse


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Marcuse

Herbert. 1898--1979, US philosopher, born in Germany. In his later works he analysed the situation of man under monopoly capitalism and the dehumanizing effects of modern technology. His works include Eros and Civilization (1958) and One Dimensional Man (1964)
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In chapter 4, Peter Marcuse agrees with Forman that the revolutionary subject should be the underprivileged in the global capitalist order.
En un texto de 1941 titulado Reason and Revolution Herbert Marcuse analiza como el acontecer filosofico del siglo XIX se inserta, a su juicio por vez primera, en la observacion de las condiciones sociales que forman el marco general en el cual opera toda reflexion filosofica.
Although he was more willing than Fromm or Marcuse to accept the use of force in the foundation and defense of Israel--which he viewed as a tragic necessity to dispel the antisemitic myth that Jews were not able to defend themselves--Lowenthal also expressed concerns later in his life about the increasingly powerful conservative nationalist and militaristic tendencies in Israel.
Marcuse said it's not uncommon to see situations such as the one Sicola faced, where she trained a male subordinate, only to be let go and have the subordinate replace her.
PJ: In the film, Marcuse justifies using civil disobedience against violent forms of oppression.
For people like Marcuse and Neumann, both of whom were committed non-Communist leftists, recording and discussing Hitler's socialist policies were not a high priority.
It uses the contradictions of reality to better understand antagonistic forces at work in the world (Antonio, 1981; Marcuse, 1964).
En el se pueden encontrar reflexiones que abarcan desde pensadores conservadores como Huntington hasta filosofos criticos con la sociedad industrial como Marcuse.
Marcuse, of course, was not imagining the world that we live in today.
Declassified in 1975 and 1976, the documents presented in this volume were written by Neumann, Marcuse, and Kirchheimer between 1943 and 1949 for the Central European Section of the Research and Analysis Branch of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS).
I]f Marcuse was the Jesus of the New Left, then Alinsky was his Saint Paul, proselytizing and dumbing down Marcuse's message, making it practical and convincing leaders to make it the official religion of the United States, even if that meant discarding the old secular religion of the United States, the Constitution.
While the collection presents essays on dominant figures, including the 'less optimistic' Adorno and Horkheimer and the 'hopeful and unsure' Herbert Marcuse, it also provides analyses and assessments of Walter Benjamin and Siegfried Kracauer, both of whom witnessed 'democratic moments and possibilities of emancipation' in cultural production (pp.