Marenzio


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Marenzio

Luca . 1553--99, Italian composer of madrigals
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The program will include English and Italian motets and madrigals by such Renaissance composers as Thomas Morley, Thomas Ravenscroft, Luca Marenzio and Giovanni Palestrina.
The piece was composed by Marenzio during his stay in Poland in his position as the royal choir Kapellmeister of King Zygmunt III Waza.
which will include motets for Ascensiontide and Pentecost by Byrd, Tallis, Marenzio, Palestrina and Stanford as well as two pieces in praise of St Cuthbert, one by John Roper and the other by Paul Spicer.
In Italy Dowland was so enchanted by the madrigals of Luca Marenzio that he imported their melodiousness and poetics into his own most valuable compositions--his songs with lute accompaniment.
Free scores by Luca Marenzio in the Choral Public Domain Library--ChoralWiki The previous sentences provide evidence that "beer batter" and "seasoned flour" belong to a facet, "parsley" and "pecan halves" to another, and "Anton Bruckner" and "Luca Marenzio" to yet another.
The music of Luca Marenzio was a delightful discovery, and the sequence of songs and an instrumental piece by William Byrd confirmed the greatness and the versatility of this composer.
Pederson's madrigals are skillfully composed in the style of the time, but less adventurous than the avant-garde madrigals by composers such as Luca Marenzio, Carlo Gesualdo, and Claudio Monteverdi.
Bach, Marenzio, Rossini, and Monteverdi, as well as still more from Vivaldi, and the sound and performance of each sample is right up there with the best.
03: Early Music Ensemble of San Diego, with works by Monteverdi, Marenzio, Landini, Katholische Kirche.
So, too, were the pieces by Marenzio and Robert Jones.
In items by Marenzio, Palestrina and Lassus, the dynamics ebbed and flowed with subtle power, phrase ends floated with stunning control, dissonance was treated delicately and changes in vocal timbre sensitively conveyed the significance of text.
I have here individual pieces of liturgical choral music and smaller samples of great works: from the sixteenth century two widely arching choruses filling a single melodic breath from Palestrina's [1525-94] Pope Marcillus Mass, the "Sanctus" and the "Benedictus," both sung by the Berlin Cathedral Choir under Rudel; and, sung by the silvery Italian voices of the Casimir Choir, choruses of the two old "Venetians" Marenzio and Viadana, the former full of stimulating freshness, the latter, the beginning of Psalm 33, a most tender rejoicing; finally--the Basilica Choir, the Choir of the Hedwig Church in Berlin--by the great maestro of the north, Lasso, a composition, radiant in glasslike eight voices, of the verses of Psalm 89.