mare

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mare

1
the adult female of a horse or zebra

mare

2
1. any of a large number of huge dry plains on the surface of the moon, visible as dark markings and once thought to be seas: Mare Imbrium (Sea of Showers)
2. a similar area on the surface of Mars, such as Mare Sirenum

mare

(mah -ree, -ray, mair -ee) (plural: maria) a large relatively smooth dark area on the surface of a planet or satellite. The word is used in the approved name of such a surface feature. (Latin: sea)

mare

[′mär·ā, mer]
(astronomy)
One of the large, dark, flat areas on the lunar surface.
One of the less well-defined areas on Mars.
(vertebrate zoology)
A mature female horse or other equine.
References in classic literature ?
The major then rolled over the men who were sleeping on his blankets, which he tossed into the carriage, together with some roasted fragments of his mare.
Good morning, mister," said the pedlar, reining in his mare.
Scarcely had the yellow man spoken, when he interrupted himself, and though he seemed weary enough before, continued his journey at a pace which would have kept the pedlar's mare on a smart trot.
Lady Barbarity is far too good a mare to have her knees broken.
That one I like best," he added, pointing to a dark bay mare, who was already giving her boy some trouble.
Chris called out, and the next moment the mare was rising under him in a second buck.
Lute looked on, astounded at the unprecedented conduct of her mare, and admiring her lover's horsemanship.
Of course, the short cut was the long way round; and it was nearly dark when that unlucky mare and I saw the single street of Yea.
I had determined to rob that bank instead of going to bed, and to be back in Melbourne for breakfast if the doctor's mare could do it.
A shilling of it is in case of accidents--the mare casting a shoe, or the like of that.
The bay mare splashed away, through the mud and water, with drooping ears; now and then tossing her head as if to express her disgust at this very ungentlemanly behaviour of the elements, but keeping a good pace notwithstanding, until a gust of wind, more furious than any that had yet assailed them, caused her to stop suddenly and plant her four feet firmly against the ground, to prevent her being blown over.
With the cry of "now," the mare tugged with all her might, but far from galloping, could scarcely move forward; she struggled with her legs, gasping and shrinking from the blows of the three whips which were showered upon her like hail.